-->
Home Store Project Ideas Project Guide Ask An Expert Blog Careers Teachers Parents Students

Science on the Move: One if By Land, Two if By Sea

newsletter-july-boat.jpg
Paper airplanes are popular for all ages, and in my house we're continually at work testing new models or trying to memorize the steps of favorite, tried-and-true designs like the Nakamura Lock. Moving outside, however, opens up aerodynamic and hyrdrodynamic exploration even more, making these kinds of hands-on science projects perfect for summer days at the park, near a small stream, or poolside.


Here are a few projects suitable for all ages, with parental guidance and assistance, to try this summer:

Planes:
Paper airplanes offer endless variety for exploring aerodynamic principles, but you can take your flight dynamics to new heights when you add a bit of glue and build thicker and sturdier planes... layer by layer. If you've assembled a balsa wood glider, you'll see similarities in design as you begin modeling your own laminated planes and testing flight patterns to see which features add stability, flight duration, or distance.
What Makes a Good Aerodynamic Design? can help get you started thinking about assembly and designing your trials. (Difficulty 5-7)

Boats:
Switching to water and hydrodynamics, milk cartons put boat design on the radar—and float some recyclables! After watching a PBS DragonFly video, roll up your sleeves, rinse out some empty milk cartons, and find out which features best float your boat. In the Milk Does Your Body and a Boat Good—Design Your Own Milk Carton Boat project, create and test a variety of boat designs, ranging from a simple raft to a boat with a V-shaped hull. (Difficulty: 3)


Hovercrafts:
To switch things up even more, give the science of hovercrafts a whirl! How Does a Hovercraft Work? will walk you through constructing your own small balloon-powered hovercraft from readily available materials: a CD, a recycled bottle, and a balloon. As you might guess, how big you blow up the balloon will be a key factor in the performance of your hovercraft! No water is required, but you might try this one poolside! (Difficulty: 1)

Science Buddies Science Activities

Science Buddies and Autodesk for Student STEM Exploration


thumbnail
Thanks to Aerojet Rocketdyne, the INFINITY Science Center, and Science Buddies, teachers in Mississippi got a booster course in rocket science—and paper airplane folding.

thumbnail
School and family science weekly spotlight: use dough to explore the relationship between dimensions of an object and volume.

thumbnail
In movies like Dolphin Tale, you don't have to look far to find the engineering design process in action. With the steps of the engineering process being acted out as the story unfolds, students see that success often involves a great deal of trial, error, testing, and redesigning.

thumbnail
School and family science weekly spotlight: explore the science of making soup from dried beans.

thumbnail
Book 3 in the Nick and Tesla series offers great gadget-oriented science and engineering fun from the twins as they stay with their eccentric scientist uncle for the summer.

thumbnail
School and family science weekly spotlight: explore the role of fat and temperature on pie crust texture.



Your Science!
What will you explore for your science project this year? What is your favorite classroom science activity? Email us a short (one to three sentences) summary of your science project or teaching tip. You might end up featured in an upcoming Science Buddies newsletter!



You may print and distribute up to 200 copies of this document annually, at no charge, for personal and classroom educational use. When printing this document, you may NOT modify it in any way. For any other use, please contact Science Buddies.