-->
Home Store Project Ideas Project Guide Ask An Expert Blog Careers Teachers Parents Students

Intel ISEF Winners Named

Winners of the 2012 Intel ISEF have been named and the confetti thrown! Science Buddies is proud to find some of our student success stories and student volunteers among the winners.


2012-ISEF-winners-250.png

2012 Intel ISEF winners of the Gordon E. Moor Award and the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award. Source: Society for Science & the Public

This year's top Intel ISEF winner and recipient of the Gordon E. Moore Award is Jack Andraka. The fifteen year old from Crownsville, MD, won first place for his research on the detection of pancreatic cancer. Jack developed and tested a "dip-stick sensor" test that can be used for early detection of pancreatic cancer.

Nicholas Schiefer (Pickering, Ontario, Canada) and Ari Dyckovsky (Leesburg, VA) were each named recipients of the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award. Nicholas' computer science research is on search engine technology. Ari's research is on quantum teleportation.


Science Buddies' Connections

Science Buddies extends special congratulations to Nithin Tumma, Christina Ren, and Travis Sigafoos.

  • Nithin, winner of the 2012 Intel Science Talent Search, won 2nd place at Intel ISEF in Cellular and Molecular Biology for his project, "Elucidating Pathways in Cancer Pathogenesis." Nithin, a senior at Port Huron Northern High School in Port Huron, MI, was previously a high school volunteer mentor for the Science Buddies Ask an Expert forums and was named the Craig Sander Outstanding Mentor last year.
  • Christina won 3rd place in Medicine and Health Sciences for her project, "The Effect of Deer Antler on the Proliferation of Endothelial Cells in vitro." Christina, a sophomore at Monte Vista High School in Danville, CA, has been working with Bio-Rad Laboratories' Donna Hardy, a long-time volunteer Expert in the Science Buddies Ask an Expert forums.
  • Travis won 3rd place in Behavioral and Social Sciences for his project, "Spectrum of Triangulation: ADHD, Circadian Rhythmicity, and Bipolar Symptoms." Travis, a senior at Champlin Park High School in Champlin, MN, is a current high school volunteer mentor for Science Buddies Ask an Expert forums.

While we are especially proud to see our student volunteers and students who are working with Science Buddies' mentors succeed, with over 1500 student science projects on display at the Intel ISEF this year, every student who attended deserves recognition and congratulations.


(For more about Intel ISEF, the Science Buddies Summer Fellows Program, and the importance of celebrating science successes big and small, see "Celebrating Student Science.")





Bio-Rad Laboratories is the sponsor of the Biotechnology Techniques interest area at Science Buddies.

Science Buddies Science Activities

Science Buddies and Autodesk for Student STEM Exploration


thumbnail
We go DIY with molecular gastronomy and family science as we make our own popping boba using the Spherification Kit from the Science Buddies Store.

thumbnail
The current Ebola crisis in West Africa has already topped charts for all Ebola outbreaks in history. Medical biotechnology science projects let students gets hands-on with projects that parallel real-world research and development.

thumbnail
An unusual caterpillar brings lots of "eeeews!" and one contribution to a citizen science project. Discover how anyone can collaborate on serious scientific research.

thumbnail
UC Berkeley Professor Dan Garcia talks about the kind of "drag-and-drop," block-based, snap-together programming environments that are becoming increasingly popular as a way to introduce students of all ages to code.

thumbnail
With a smorgasbord of fun, engaging, playful, and puzzling modules available as part of the Hour of Code initiative, kids can experiment with programming basics and sample Javascript, Python, Ruby, and more.

thumbnail
The Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Contest gives U.S. secondary public schools a chance to use STEM to help address problems affecting their students and communities--and a chance at a share of $2 million in technology.



Your Science!
What will you explore for your science project this year? What is your favorite classroom science activity? Email us a short (one to three sentences) summary of your science project or teaching tip. You might end up featured in an upcoming Science Buddies newsletter!



You may print and distribute up to 200 copies of this document annually, at no charge, for personal and classroom educational use. When printing this document, you may NOT modify it in any way. For any other use, please contact Science Buddies.