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Moon Size Science: Weekly Science Project Idea and Home Science Activity Spotlight

Weekly Science Activity Spotlight / Full Moon Illusion Science Project for School or Family Science
(Moon rise image credit: Thomas Fietzek, Wikimedia Commons)

In this week's spotlight: a pair of human biology and health science projects to help students and families better understand the way our eyes perceive the full moon rising. If you have noticed that a full moon sometimes seems very big and then smaller as it rises, you have seen the full moon illusion in action. Learn more about Emmert's Law and experiment to find out why and how our perception of the moon's size changes based on where it is in the sky:


Take It Further

By the way, this week's full moon (on Tuesday, August 20) was also, technically, a Blue Moon, a label which has nothing to do with the color and a lot to do with the old adage we often hear and use of something happening "once in a blue moon"! Find out more about the history and science of the Blue Moon in this article at Space.com. See also: "When the Moon Is Full (Or Seems to Be)" and "Visual Illusions: When What You See Is... Not What's There?" on the Science Buddies Blog.

This cool video by photographer Mark Gee gives a great look at a few minutes of a stunning moon rise in Wellington, New Zealand. Will the moon look so big once it is fully risen? Did it actually change? That's what this week's science activity highlight is all about!

Full moon Mark Gee Video Screenshot
Featured Science Kit for Summer Science Fun from the Science Buddies Store

Science Buddies Science Activities

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The classic game of Galaga provided inspiration for this sixth grade student as he designed his own video game to learn more about the role of hit boxes in creating a successful game.

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Investigate how sugar and sugar substitutes compare in terms of sweetness in this family science activity spotlight.

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With more data flowing in than most of us can ever hope to sift through, infographics have emerged as a viewer-friendly way to convey data-driven information.



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