The rate colour loss from cut roses

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The rate colour loss from cut roses

Postby eahrens1 » Sun Feb 17, 2013 8:02 am

I am comparing homemade liquid cut plant food and shop bought liquid cut plant food on the rate of colour in roses. I would like help on what ingredients stabilise the pigments within the roses and how they stabilise them. What pigments are in roses? I know that the acidic content helps to stabilise the pigments but I don't know how or why. Please help!
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Project Question: The comparison on the loss of colour from cut roses in homemade liquid plant food and shop bought plant food
Project Due Date: 01/04/13
Project Status: I am conducting my research

Re: The rate colour loss from cut roses

Postby donnahardy2 » Sun Feb 17, 2013 8:04 pm

Hi,

Welcome to Science Buddies!

This is a very interesting and challenging project. Rose pigments based primarily on anthocyanins and carotenoid pigments and the expression of the color depends on the growing conditions, and particularly the light conditions. For example, rose color is more intense in the early spring and late fall, and less intense during the middle of the summer. The color of the rose also depends on the specific variety of rose.

Will you please explain more about the purpose of your experiment? Are you planning to extract the pigments from rose petals and purify them? What color of roses are you planning to work with? Anthocyanins are not particularly stable molecules, but I could probably provide some advice for designing an experiment if you could explain what you were thinking about doing.

Here is a project on flow pigments from the Science Buddies website. You could adapt this experiment, which uses paper chromatography to purify the pigments, or perhaps use a different technique.

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... p035.shtml

Please post again in this topic to continue the discussion.

Donna Hardy
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Re: The rate colour loss from cut roses

Postby donnahardy2 » Mon Feb 18, 2013 9:15 am

Hi,

Here is a reference article that provides good background information for your project. This is a good paper because it includes the details of the methods used, and there is free access to the complete article. The authors measured anthocyanins and other molecules in Chinese bayberries.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/jf048312z

The anthocyanins were extracted with methanol containing 1% HCl, filtered, and the freeze dried.

The anthocyanins and other compounds were analyzed by HPLC on a reversed phase column; the anthocyanins were detected at 520 nm (see Figure 1) . The figure includes the chemical structure of the anthocyanin.

Figure 3 of the paper shows stability of the anthocyanin pigments at different pH levels after 24 hours of storage; the pigments were very stable at pH 1.5, and had completely degraded at pH 11.

Rose pigments will have a similar structure as the Chinese bilberry pigments and you could use the same techniques to study them. Do you have access to a laboratory with any of the equipment described in this paper?


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