Radiation

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Radiation

Postby Ekkalux » Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:43 pm

My partner and I had decided to do our science fair project on radiation exposure. We want to know if there is a specific type of chemicals or hormones that can inhibit or slow down the effect of the damaging DNA on DNA cells due to radiation.
Would it be best to test human DNA cells or plant cell? Also, would an X-Ray machine be a practical application to test the radiation on the cells?
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Re: Radiation

Postby donnahardy2 » Sun Oct 21, 2012 7:06 pm

Hi,

This is a great idea for a science project. Are you planning to make your own x-ray machine as described in this Science Buddies project:

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... p083.shtml

Or, are you going to test the effect of x-rays on cells as outlined in this project?

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... p030.shtml

X-rays are high energy wavelengths of light that break bonds in the DNA of cells. I don't know of chemical or hormone that would help protect the DNA; the best protection is a lead shield that prevents the x-rays from reaching the cells.

However, have you done a literature search on this topic? It is an unique idea for a science project.

The selection of the cell type would depend on what you have available; if you were interested in human DNA, you would have to work with tissue culture cells, which would require access to a laboratory and would make the project even more challenging. It might be easier to work with bacteria or yeast as you would obtain results more quickly. The type of cell that you choose will be one of your controlled variables, and any live cell would be suitable.

How are you going to measure your results?


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Re: Radiation

Postby Ekkalux » Mon Oct 22, 2012 9:08 am

Hi Donnahardy2,
Thank you for your reply. We are planning to use an X-ray from a local hospital or laboratory because building one is too expensive. We researched that Vitamins can help protect against potential radiation particles such as Vitamin C or Vitamin E. Would it be possible to expose these vitamins to bacteria or yeast cells and zap it with an X-Ray to see its effect? Also, are there any procedure to inject the bacteria or yeast cells?
We are planning to use biomarkers and gel electrophoresis to measure the results.
Ekkalux
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 7:47 pm
Occupation: Student:12th grade
Project Question: CCCSEF
Project Due Date: October 30
Project Status: I am just starting

Re: Radiation

Postby donnahardy2 » Mon Oct 22, 2012 5:44 pm

Hi,

Oh good, it sounds like you have found some references on this subject. In that case, if you use bacteria or yeast, you could just add the vitamins to the growth medium before exposing the cells to x-rays.

You should do more than one concentration of vitamins to test effect of different concentrations of vitamins. And, do make sure that you use cultures that have been grown for the same amount of time, probably either in late log or early stationary phase.

Do bacteria or yeast utilize vitamin C or Vitamin D? Or are these nutrients only required by humans?

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Re: Radiation

Postby Ekkalux » Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:01 pm

I've been trying to look into if bacteria or yeast can consume vitamins but found no promising information. However, do you think using biomarker and gel electrophoresis as a way to measure our results a good appliance? Or are there other alternatives?
Ekkalux
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 7:47 pm
Occupation: Student:12th grade
Project Question: CCCSEF
Project Due Date: October 30
Project Status: I am just starting

Re: Radiation

Postby donnahardy2 » Wed Oct 24, 2012 7:04 am

Hi,

What biomarkers were you planning to use? X-rays damage DNA, so you would expect to see a change in the function of DNA.

One possible alternative is to do the Ames mutagenicity test. The Wikipedia article gives a good description of this assay and references that will give you detailed information. This would be a good way to measure your results.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ames_test

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Re: Radiation

Postby Ekkalux » Wed Oct 24, 2012 2:16 pm

Hi DonnaHardy,
Thank you for the link, we changed our mind and decided to use plant cells for our experiment because it can consume vitamins. We will get back when we have further questions.
Ekkalux
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 7:47 pm
Occupation: Student:12th grade
Project Question: CCCSEF
Project Due Date: October 30
Project Status: I am just starting

Re: Radiation

Postby donnahardy2 » Thu Oct 25, 2012 8:06 am

Hi Ekkalux,

I think that using plant cells as a controlled variable is a good choice for this experiment.

Good luck!

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Re: Radiation

Postby Ekkalux » Sun Nov 04, 2012 4:39 pm

I want to use an alternative application other than X-Ray because X-Rays are kind of inconvenient. Is it possible to culture plant cells and place them in a microwave oven to see its effect on the plants? I know that microwave radiation are not as strong as X-Ray, but what if you microwave the plants for a certain number of time? We would also add Vitamin C into the culture plant cells before microwaving because we want to see if Vitamin C can combat against microwave radiation.
Ekkalux
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 7:47 pm
Occupation: Student:12th grade
Project Question: CCCSEF
Project Due Date: October 30
Project Status: I am just starting

Re: Radiation

Postby donnahardy2 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:01 am

Hi,

Using microwaves is definitely a good alternative. Here is a project from the Science Buddies website that describes how to measure microwaves:

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... #procedure

And here is a description of t project that measured the effect of microwaves on seed germination. Seed germination is good because you can use lots of seeds a easily count the percentage of seeds that germinate.

http://www.education.com/science-fair/a ... fect-seed/

You can probably adapt ideas from these projects for your experiment.

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