Where to get L. acidophilus?

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Where to get L. acidophilus?

Postby a380bg » Sun Nov 18, 2012 7:32 pm

For my project I have decided to test L. acidophilus as my bacterium. I was planning to buy live probiotic capsules and cut them in half and use an inoculation loop to inoculate my dishes. Is there a better and cheaper way to to this? Thanks in advance!
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Re: Where to get L. acidophilus?

Postby a380bg » Mon Nov 19, 2012 7:05 pm

BUMP
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Re: Where to get L. acidophilus?

Postby sarahlaugtug » Wed Nov 21, 2012 6:51 pm

Hello a380bg,

What is the title of your project and what is your hypothesis?
Have you explored this project to give some ideas?
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... ml#summary

Here is an article that tells more about the species and where to find it:
http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/lact ... 000310.htm

This tells more about yogurt fermentation with Lactobacillus. You can get pure Lactobacillus from using Plain yogurt (not flavored). Here is an excerpt from that article that should give you more information:

"The yogurt in a local market usually contains an active culture. Thus, if a starter culture is not readily available, it can be easily derived from plain store-bought yogurt. In this case, a few teaspoonfuls of the store-bought yogurt will adequately act as as the starter culture. (Make sure the label on the package indicates that it indeed contains an active culture.) The culture in fresh yogurt is healthier and more active than that in an outdated one. A stale one is also more likely to be contaminated with undesirable microorganisms, so check the expiration date. If possible, choose the "All-Natural" variety, because stabilizers and additives, included to suppress microbial activities, are generally harmful to the culture. If one is making yogurt at home, it is more convenient to pour the mixture into smaller containers before incubation; drinking glasses are just about the right serving size. Seal the glasses with a lid or plastic food wrap. Place all the glasses in a baking pan for easy handling. " http://www.eng.umd.edu/~nsw/ench485/lab8.htm

Let us know how it goes? Good luck. :D
Always remain curious,
Sarah
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