How Can I find the rate on Baking soda and vinegar reacting?

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How Can I find the rate on Baking soda and vinegar reacting?

Postby m2woolridge » Thu Nov 15, 2007 10:14 am

:D How can i find the rate of change on Baking Soda and vinegar?
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Postby staryl13 » Thu Nov 15, 2007 3:53 pm

Hi!
Could you please be a little more specific in your question? What do you mean by rate of change? In order for us to help you, we need to understand what you're asking first. Thanks!
"There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere." -Isaac Asimov
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Postby Craig_Bridge » Thu Nov 15, 2007 5:24 pm

What grade are you in? Knowing if you have had chemistry or not will help determine what is grade appropriate methodology and terminology.

http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem99/chem99096.htm Documents the chemical reactions involved which releases CO2 as a gas.

If you want to measure how fast the reaction occurs, one way would be to measure the rate of CO2 release. Actually doing this is more difficult than it appears for a variety of reasons and explaining them is even more difficult depending on what grade level and how much physics and chemistry you know.

What is your hypothesis? We maybe able to recommand a minor change that would make the measurements simpler.
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Vinegar & Baking Soda reaction

Postby m2woolridge » Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:47 am

I'm in the 11th grade and I took chemistry in the 10th grade I remember a little. My hypothesis is ----- I think the reaction will react more effectively and faster if the vinegar is heated. I am using three different temperatures of vinegar. Hot(boiling). room temp. and Cold. How will I measure/record how fast the reaction occurs? What do you consider a simplier way of completing my project? :?: :?: I Thank You so much for your help!! :)
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How can i find the rate of change on Baking Soda and vinegar

Postby m2woolridge » Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:50 am

Hey,
I'm in the 11th grade My hypothesis is ----- I think the reaction will react more effectively and faster if the vinegar is heated. I am using three different temperatures of vinegar. Hot(boiling). room temp. and Cold. How will I measure/record how fast the reaction occurs? Thank You so much for your help!!
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Postby Terik Daly » Thu Nov 29, 2007 1:45 pm

One method that comes to mind is measuring how long it takes until the reagents care completely used up. I don't know if you remember this from chemistry, but in any chemical reaction, the reaction only proceeds until one of the reactants is used up (this is called the limiting reagent) if you use constant amounts of baking soda and vinegar, you could measure the time from when you first combine the reactants until the bubbles stop using a stopwatch. It may not be the most accurate way to measure the difference in reaction rate, but it should give at least comparative results.
All the best,
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Postby Craig_Bridge » Thu Nov 29, 2007 1:48 pm

If you place the baking soda in a balloon, attach the balloon to the top of a test tube with an excess of vinegar in it, and then pick up the balloon to dump the baking soda into the test tube and time it with a stop watch until it stops bubbling you can measure the reaction time to completion fairly easily.

If you had some expensive equipment to measure the rate of gas production, you could see that the reaction starts out slowly as not all of the ingredients come in contact with each other at the same time and then ramps up to some peak rate and then drops off as the baking soda is consumed. Acquiring an accurate representation of this reaction rate curve is extremely difficult for a variety of reasons. Ideal Gas law pressure/temperature/volume relationships, some CO2 will remain disolved in the vinegar liquid as a function of pressure and temperature, the heat of fusion of CO2, and the fact that this reaction is endothermic (the temperature of the vinegar will actually decrease as the reaction occurs).

Do some web searches. I can't seem to find the URL I referenced in an earlier thread on this that had a very good graph made by somebody with expensive equipment to explain the thermodynamics of this reaction.
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Postby Craig_Bridge » Thu Nov 29, 2007 4:08 pm

-Craig
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Vinegar & Baking Soda reaction

Postby m2woolridge » Thu Dec 13, 2007 9:41 am

I did the balloon reactions & my results were OOK! i like the idea of the balloons in the test tube. Do think i should use more vinegar than baking soda or more baking soda than vinegar????????? How would i record my time? in seconds??? and would i use a stop watch?? do you suggest hot warm or cold water?????


THANKS alot for the help i really appreciate it alot!!! :D :D
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Postby induced_discharge » Thu Dec 13, 2007 1:09 pm

The reaction you are looking at is the neutralization of acetic acid with a bicarbonate ion. This creates an disolved acetate ion and carbonic acid which the diassociates into water and the gas you are attempting to measure which is carbondioxide. If you write out the full equation you will see that all the mole ratios are 1:1 which means you need the same amount of bicarbonate and acetic acid. Using basic stoichmetry with the concentration of your acid c=n/v and the molar mass of your sodium bicabonate n=m/M you can figure out how much of each material you need for a theoretically ideal nonlimiting reaction.

That being said it doesn't really matter if one is in excess so long as you use the same amount throughout but this gives you a good background anyways haha.

Since your experiment is attempting to determine the effect of temperature on rate of reaction, you are going to want to graph the percent of the reaction complete at certain times, however it doesn't matter how precise you are as long as you can make comparisons between results. Doing a small scale reaction which creates enough gas to just blow up a balloon and measuring the size of the balloon through would accomplish this I think as long as you can effectively determine the volume in the balloon.

Also using boiling vinegar might really complicate this experiment and you may be able to draw effective enough conclusions without going to the extreme.
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Re: How Can I find the rate on Baking soda and vinegar react

Postby Serje » Fri May 20, 2011 2:21 am



Oh yeah!!!! This is it!!! Thanks Craig_Bridge )))
It's really thing I looking for))
I like your forum )))
Craig_Bridge - I love you man! :)
Wow!! ))) Yeah :))
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