Marine Biologist as a career

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Marine Biologist as a career

Postby Penelope » Wed Feb 13, 2013 7:53 pm

I am investigating the career of marine biologist. I am hoping an actual marine biologist might take a few moments to answer some of my questions about their field:

1. What training is required in order to become a marine biologist?
2. How long does it take to become a marine biologist?
3. Are there many jobs available for a marine biologist?
4. Do marine biologists need a scuba license?
5. Describe the lifestyle of a marine biologist.
6. What are the biggest challenges marine biologists face?
7. What were your favorite and least favorite parts of studying marine biology?
8. Do you enjoy your job?
9. What do you consider the most exciting new developments in your field?
10. Do marine biologists collaborate with sciences of other disciplines on a regular basis?

Thank you very much,
Penelope
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Re: Marine Biologist as a career

Postby Limeybean » Tue Mar 05, 2013 11:23 pm

Hi Penelope,

I am going to preface this by saying that I am not a marine biologist. I do however know a few of them and here is one marine biologist's answers to your questions. He just earned his PhD last fall.

Cheers,
Emily

1. Usually at least a bachelor's degree, and a masters and PhD if you want to do research
2. Depends how much you get into #1 - anywhere from 4-10 years (but while you're in grad school you're pretty much a marine biologist by then)
3. Probably just as many as any other scientist, except for computer scientists
4. Not at all, but if you have the time, money, and physical ability then you should - because SCUBA diving is awesome
5. That's a tough one. Some spend most of their time in the lab, some are in or near the ocean a lot. Depends on what you choose to do.
6. Probably school and then getting grants if you end up doing research - these challenges are the same for any scientist
7. Favorite things are traveling, being in the ocean, and learning about all the cool things that live there. Least favorite are data analysis, writing up results, and knowing how much humans are doing to hurt the oceans.
8. Yes, I couldn't imagine doing anything else.
9. New methods for DNA sequencing are revolutionizing all of biology. Relatively recently explorations of the deep sea are also really cool.
10. Definitely, it's one of my favorite aspects about being a biologist.
Limeybean
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Re: Marine Biologist as a career

Postby Limeybean » Sun Mar 10, 2013 9:37 am

Here is a different person's take on your questions...

What training is required in order to become a marine biologist?
Good basis in Biology, Chemistry, Ecology, Mathematics and Statistics. Economics also helpful.
2. How long does it take to become a marine biologist?
Your whole life.
3. Are there many jobs available for a marine biologist?
I wish I could say yes, but no. You have to realise going into it that finding a job is either going to be really easy (bc of connections or luck) or extremely difficult.
4. Do marine biologists need a scuba license?
Most do.
5. Describe the lifestyle of a marine biologist.
Right now, I'm on an island in the Torres Strait, north of Australia. I work 12+ hr days but get to chopper over pristine reefs. I don't get paid overtime or very well in general. I work long and hard, sometimes its very frustrating. Sometimes I wonder why I do it. Then I get to do this trip.
It's ups and downs.
6. What are the biggest challenges marine biologists face?
Finding a job. Getting paid well. And by that I don't mean having a lot of money, but when you decide to have a family one day, it will feel like you earn NOTHING.
Also people think you play with dolphins all day = little street cred.
7. What were your favorite and least favorite parts of studying marine biology?
of studying, I loved oceanography. Life histories of corals. The vast interconnectedness of our ecosystems.
8. Do you enjoy your job?
90% of the time I have to pinch myself.
9. What do you consider the most exciting new developments in your field?
We're developing tissue nutrient analysis to detect early signs of stress in seagrasses. Not exactly cutting edge, but usefull all the same in port developments around the nation.
10. Do marine biologists collaborate with sciences of other disciplines on a regular basis?
Definately. I started out a fish ecologist and somehow I now work on seagrass. Collaboration, yes.
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Re: Marine Biologist as a career

Postby Limeybean » Fri Mar 15, 2013 6:58 pm

(From a third perspective...)

I'd also add to number five that marine biology is one of the few places where you can see a guy in flip flops, shorts, and an old wrinkled shirt and not only is he a scientist, but he's probably the main guy in charge. The lifestyle is a big, if not THE biggest driver for why people do these types of jobs. As such, marine scientists are often happy and passionate about their work (see his answer #8, for instance).

For #9, I think the answer is technology, in general. Computers with crazy processing power, Skype and video conferencing makes collaborations much easier, GPS tags for animals, etc...

For #10, absolutely, and now more than ever before. For example, my team of researchers includes a few social scientists, an anthropologist, a communications expert, a GIS/technology whiz, a marine biologist, and we regularly collaborate with other fields. It's fantastic.
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Re: Marine Biologist as a career

Postby Ggipunjab » Wed Aug 28, 2013 1:08 am

Limeybean wrote:Here is a different person's take on your questions...

What training is required in order to become a marine biologist?
Good basis in Biology, Chemistry, Ecology, Mathematics and Statistics. Economics also helpful.
2. How long does it take to become a marine biologist?
Your whole life.
3. Are there many jobs available for a marine biologist?
I wish I could say yes, but no. You have to realise going into it that finding a job is either going to be really easy (bc of connections or luck) or extremely difficult.
4. Do marine biologists need a scuba license?
Most do.
5. Describe the lifestyle of a marine biologist.
Right now, I'm on an island in the Torres Strait, north of Australia. I work 12+ hr days but get to chopper over pristine reefs. I don't get paid overtime or very well in general. I work long and hard, sometimes its very frustrating. Sometimes I wonder why I do it. Then I get to do this trip.
It's ups and downs.
6. What are the biggest challenges marine biologists face?
Finding a job. Getting paid well. And by that I don't mean having a lot of money, but when you decide to have a family one day, it will feel like you earn NOTHING.
Also people think you play with dolphins all day = little street cred.
7. What were your favorite and least favorite parts of studying marine biology?
of studying, I loved oceanography. Life histories of corals. The vast interconnectedness of our ecosystems.
8. Do you enjoy your job?
90% of the time I have to pinch myself.
9. What do you consider the most exciting new developments in your field?
We're developing tissue nutrient analysis to detect early signs of stress in seagrasses. Not exactly cutting edge, but usefull all the same in port developments around the nation.
10. Do marine biologists collaborate with sciences of other disciplines on a regular basis?
Definately. I started out a fish ecologist and somehow I now work on seagrass. Collaboration, yes.



Very few person are working in the Marine Biologist ..
and i think their is the future in this profession..
Find and search B.Tech colleges in Punjab
Website - http://ggi.ac.in/btech_it.html
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