can i still enter without a local mentor?

Questions related to finding and working with a mentor, finding an idea, etc.

Moderators: MelissaB, kgudger, Moderators

can i still enter without a local mentor?

Postby dorothyyim » Sun May 22, 2011 5:10 pm

hi everyone! for months now, I have been doing private research on a potential cure to Alzheimer's disease, and I have been trying and trying to get a local mentor from a university. i have sent out about 40 emails, but everyone says they are not accepting students.

my dream has always been to enter the intel/siemens science competition. i don't have a mentor though... and i think that my project would be really difficult to do without a mentor.. should i actually create a presentation and go to the professors' offices and present my idea to them?

here is my research question: "How does the use of small, interfering RNA (siRNA) act as a therapeutic potential in silencing the mutational alleles of Alzheimer's disease?"

a bit hard to that without a mentor, no? well, please help!!!!
dorothyyim
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun May 22, 2011 4:55 pm
Occupation: Student: 11th grade
Project Question: How does the use of small, interfering RNA (siRNA) act as a therapeutic potential in silencing the mutational alleles of Alzheimer's disease while still allowing the expression of normal alleles? What methods would be used to match the siRNA to the mutation gene, and how does gene expression work from there?
Project Due Date: October/November
Project Status: I am just starting

Re: can i still enter without a local mentor?

Postby MelissaB » Wed May 25, 2011 7:53 am

Hi,

Science Buddies has some great resources on advanced projects--see the advanced project guide on this page: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... l?From=Tab .

Since I am not in that particular field of research, it is somewhat difficult for me to tell what may be going on. University professors are busy, and they receive many requests like yours. Taking on a high school student is typically a lot of work, but they get very little credit for doing so.

You say you have sent out 40 e-mails...have all 40 been to professors studying Alzheimer's? If you are sending them to other professors, they are unlikely to have the tools and expertise necessary for you to do the research you want to do. Also, have you taken the time to read their research, to see what it is that they are interested in? Generally, professors respond much more positively if they know that you are interested in the same things that interest them.
MelissaB
Moderator
 
Posts: 1055
Joined: Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:47 am


Return to Getting Started

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest