Home Project Ideas Project Guide Ask An Expert Blog Careers Teachers Parents Students

Science Buddies: Genomics Prize Rules

Congratulations to the following winners in the 2005 Molecular Sciences Institute Competition for the "Best Genomics Presentation"

Science Buddies Prize Criteria & Rules for the 2006 Molecular Sciences Institute Competition for the "Best Genomics Presentation"

These rules and regulations are based on the official rules of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), with the permission of Science Service, the organization that runs the ISEF. In case of any discrepancy, omission, or other inadequacy of the rules and guidelines, Science Buddies, in its sole discretion, will make a decision to resolve the issue.

Prizes

$750 First Place Award, $250 Runner-up Award for the "Best Genomics Presentation"

Science Buddies reserves the right to withhold awards if no projects meet minimum standards.

Eligibility

  1. Legal United States resident OR U.S. Citizen
  2. Any student in grades 7-12 (from any type of school: private, public, home school, etc.)
  3. If you are interested in participating in the prize competition, please send an e-mail to scibuddy@sciencebuddies.org with the subject line: Project Registration. The body of the e-mail must include:
    • Full name of student
    • Student's age and grade
    • Name of student's school
    • City and state where the school is located
    • Student's e-mail address
  4. If students are applying as a team, they should send ONE registration e-mail for the entire team, which includes the complete information for each of the individual team members.
  5. Participation assumes parental permission. The student and his or her parents must take full responsibility for the safety of the student's experiment.
  6. Before receiving an award, the student and his or her parents must agree in writing that the project may be published online, photographed, filmed, or taped, and that Science Buddies may use such photographs, film, or tape, and the student's name, school, grade level, and project description in connection with the Science Buddies Mentoring Program and the promotion of Science Buddies, and that the student and his family will not make any claim for invasion of privacy or any other legal right in connection with such uses by Science Buddies.

Individual or Team

Students may compete individually or in teams of up to 3 students.

Ethics Statement

Scientific fraud and misconduct are not condoned at any level of research or competition. Plagiarism, use or presentation of other researcher's work as one's own and fabrication or falsification of data will not be tolerated. We have tools to check for fraud and plagiarism and we will use them. Fraudulent projects will fail to qualify for competition.

Requirements

  1. Students must undertake one research project, of their own choosing, in the field of genomics (What is genomics?). The project may follow (but is not required to follow) the suggested "experimental procedure" or "possible variations" explained in one of the projects outlined at, the Genomics Projects Home Page.
  2. If a student's project idea requires SRC approval (What is SRC approval?), the student MUST send an e-mail to scibuddy@sciencebuddies.org with a description of the project idea and why it needs SRC approval. The student must alert the Science Buddies staff BEFORE proceeding with the project so that the Science Buddies staff can send the students instructions for how to fill out and return additional forms (safety assurances, etc).
  3. Every student must complete a research paper and save it in Microsoft Word (.doc) or plain text (.txt) format. The research paper must carefully follow the outline and sample given at http://www.sciencebuddies.org/mentoring/project_research_paper.shtml.
  4. A project display board is NOT required, but if one was created, a picture of it in .JPG format may be sent along with the research paper.
  5. If any part of the student's experiment is conducted at a research institution or industrial setting (e.g. universities, medical centers, research labs), the student must print the ISEF Form 1C: Registered Research Institutional/Industrial Setting Form. The form is available at http://www.sciserv.org/isef/document/1cinst04.pdf. The students must have the supervising scientist from the organization fill out and sign this form AFTER EXPERIMENTATION and send it postmarked on or before April 30, 2006 to:

    Science Buddies
    P.O. Box 5038
    Carmel, CA 93921

Deadlines

  1. Students must submit the research paper for their project on or before April 30, 2006 (Pacific Time). A project will be considered submitted when a student e-mails a copy of his or her research paper to scibuddy@sciencebuddies.org with the subject line: Project Submission. Date stamps on the e-mail will be checked to ensure eligibility. The e-mail must be sent on or before April 30, 2006 (Pacific Time). The body of the e-mail should include the student's full name and school.
  2. If any part of the student's experiment is conducted at a research institution or industrial setting (e.g. universities, medical centers, research labs), the student must print the ISEF Form 1C: Registered Research Institutional/Industrial Setting Form. The form is available at http://www.sciserv.org/isef/document/1cinst04.pdf. The students must have the supervising scientist from the organization fill out and sign this form AFTER EXPERIMENTATION and send it postmarked on or before April 30, 2006 to:

    Science Buddies
    P.O. Box 5038
    Carmel, CA 93921

Limitations

Each student may enter only one project which covers research done over a maximum, continuous 12 month period between May 2005 and April 2006.

Scoring

I. Creative Ability (Individual - 30, Team - 25)

  1. Does the project show creative ability and originality in the questions asked? (the approach to solving the problem, the analysis or interpretation of the data)
  2. Does the project go beyond the Cutting Edge Project description in any way or show more ingenuity or effort that might be expected from the Cutting Edge Project?

II. Scientific Thought (Individual - 30, Team - 25)

  1. Is the problem stated clearly and unambiguously?
  2. Was there a procedural plan for obtaining a solution?
  3. Are the variables clearly recognized and defined?
  4. If controls were necessary, did the student recognize their need and were they correctly used?
  5. Are there adequate data to support the conclusions?
  6. Does the finalist or team recognize the data's limitations?
  7. Does the finalist/team understand the project's ties to related research?
  8. Does the finalist/team have an idea of what further research is warranted?
  9. Did the finalist/team cite scientific literature, or only popular literature?

III. Thoroughness (Individual - 15, Team - 12)

  1. Was the purpose carried out to completion within the scope of the original intent?
  2. How completely was the problem covered?
  3. Are the conclusions based on a single experiment or replication?
  4. How complete are the project notes?
  5. Is the finalist/team aware of other approaches or theories?
  6. How much time did the finalist or team spend on the project?
  7. Is the finalist/team familiar with scientific literature in the studied field?

IV. Skill (Individual - 15, Team - 12)

  1. Does the finalist/team have the required laboratory, computation, observational and design skills to obtain supporting data?
  2. Where was the project performed (i.e., home, school laboratory, university laboratory)? If any part of the student's experiment is conducted at a research institution or industrial setting (e.g. universities, medical centers, research labs), the student must print, fill out, and return the ISEF Form 1C: Registered Research Institutional/Industrial Setting Form. (See Requirements above.)
  3. Did the student or team receive assistance from parents, teachers, scientists or engineers?
  4. Where did the equipment and supplies come from?

V. Clarity (Individual - 10, Team - 10)

  1. How clearly does the finalist discuss his/her project and explain the purpose, procedure, and conclusions?
  2. Does the written material reflect the finalist's or team's understanding of the research?
  3. Are the important phases of the project presented in an orderly manner?
  4. How clearly is the data presented?
  5. How clearly are the results presented?
  6. How well does the research paper explain the project?
  7. Did the finalist/team perform all the project work, or did someone help?

VI. Teamwork (Team Projects only - 16)

  1. Are the tasks and contributions of each team member clearly outlined?
  2. Was each team member fully involved with the project, and is each member familiar with all aspects?
  3. Does the final work reflect the coordinated efforts of all team members?