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Newspaper Tower *

Difficulty
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
*Note: This is an abbreviated Project Idea, without notes to start your background research, a specific list of materials, or a procedure for how to do the experiment. You can identify abbreviated Project Ideas by the asterisk at the end of the title. If you want a Project Idea with full instructions, please pick one without an asterisk.

Abstract

Predict how tall you can build a tower using only two sheets of newspaper as building material. You can't use tape, glue, staples, or anything else, just two sheets of newspaper. You can tear, bend, cut, or fold the newspaper. Try it out and see how close you can come to your prediction. Can you beat your prediction? As you're building, you may come up with ideas to make a better tower. Try them out! (It's not like the materials are expensive!) Here are some variations you might want to try. Allow yourself 20 cm of tape. How much taller can you make your tower? (No taping the tower to a support. The tape can only be used on the pieces of newspaper themselves.) How would you change your tower design to accommodate wind? (Simulate wind conditions with a small fan to test.) How would you change your tower design to withstand an earthquake? (Simulate by shaking the table.) How would you alter your design to be sure your tower could hold the weight of a pack of chewing gum? (WGBH Staff, 2000)

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MLA Style

Science Buddies Staff. "Newspaper Tower" Science Buddies. Science Buddies, 30 June 2014. Web. 1 Oct. 2014 <http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/CE_p016.shtml>

APA Style

Science Buddies Staff. (2014, June 30). Newspaper Tower. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/CE_p016.shtml

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Last edit date: 2014-06-30

Bibliography

WGBH Staff, 2000. "Building Big Educator's Guide, Activity: Newspaper Tower" Educational Print and Outreach Department, WGBH Educational Foundation [accessed May 26, 2006] http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/buildingbig/educator/act_tower_ho.html.

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