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Encryption *

Difficulty
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
*Note: This is an abbreviated Project Idea, without notes to start your background research, a specific list of materials, or a procedure for how to do the experiment. You can identify abbreviated Project Ideas by the asterisk at the end of the title. If you want a Project Idea with full instructions, please pick one without an asterisk.

Abstract

Want to send coded messages to your friends? Can you write a simple letter-substitution encryption program in JavaScript? How easy is it to break the simple code? Can you write a second program that "cracks" the letter-substitution code? Investigate other encryption schemes. What types of encryption are least vulnerable to attack?

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MLA Style

Science Buddies Staff. "Encryption" Science Buddies. Science Buddies, 30 June 2014. Web. 22 Oct. 2014 <http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/CompSci_p031.shtml>

APA Style

Science Buddies Staff. (2014, June 30). Encryption. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/CompSci_p031.shtml

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Last edit date: 2014-06-30

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