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Wood vs. Alternative and Recycled Materials *

Difficulty
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
*Note: This is an abbreviated Project Idea, without notes to start your background research, a specific list of materials, or a procedure for how to do the experiment. You can identify abbreviated Project Ideas by the asterisk at the end of the title. If you want a Project Idea with full instructions, please pick one without an asterisk.

Abstract

Our forests are a very important natural resource that need to be managed wisely. We use wood products for many different purposes: building materials, paper, cardboard, furniture, fuel, etc. How can we use wood products in a sustainable manner? You can do experiments that examine the growth time of different tree species to see which are good candidates for tree farming. Which types of lumber are most sustainable? You can also compare the effects of clear cutting vs. thinning a forested environment, which method is most sustainable? Which method is least intrusive and displaces the least wildlife? Experiment with alternative materials for wood, like concrete, plastic, steel, and alternative decking materials. These materials have plastic and recycled wood fibers mixed together to form a structure similar to a 2x4. Experiment with processes to re-use and recycle wood products into pulp for the cardboard and paper industry. Compare the percentages of recycled material in paper products. Invent ways to minimize paper packaging materials. (National Arbor Day Foundation, 2006; NPS, 2006; EPA, 2006)

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MLA Style

Science Buddies Staff. "Wood vs. Alternative and Recycled Materials" Science Buddies. Science Buddies, 30 June 2014. Web. 18 Dec. 2014 <http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/EnvSci_p038.shtml>

APA Style

Science Buddies Staff. (2014, June 30). Wood vs. Alternative and Recycled Materials. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/EnvSci_p038.shtml

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Last edit date: 2014-06-30

Bibliography

  • EPA, 2006. "U.S. Environmental Protection Agency," Washington, D.C. [accessed: 3/1/2006] http://www.epa.gov/.
  • National Arbor Day Foundation, 2006. "National Arbor Day Foundation," Washington, D.C. [accessed: 3/1/2006] http://www.arborday.org/.
  • NPS, 2006. "National Park Service," Washington, D.C.: National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior. [accessed: 3/1/2006] http://www.nps.gov/.

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