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Landslides *

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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
*Note: This is an abbreviated Project Idea, without notes to start your background research, a specific list of materials, or a procedure for how to do the experiment. You can identify abbreviated Project Ideas by the asterisk at the end of the title. If you want a Project Idea with full instructions, please pick one without an asterisk.

Abstract

What causes landslides? The USGS Landslide Hazards Program conducts research needed to answer major questions related to landslide hazards. Where and when will landslides occur? How big will the landslides be? How fast and how far will they move? What areas will the landslides affect or damage? How frequently do landslides occur in a given locality? Investigate the patterns of landslide occurrence in your area. Are they related to locations, geology, or topography? Are they more frequent after rainy weather? You can also investigate smaller instabilities. What is a sink hole? Sinkholes are common where the rock below the land surface is limestone, carbonate rock, salt beds, or other rocks that can naturally be dissolved by ground water circulating through them. Are there areas near you that meet these conditions and could become a sink hole? (USGS, 2006)

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Last edit date: 2013-01-10

Bibliography

USGS, 2006. "Geology Discipline Home Page," United States Geological Survey (USGS) [accessed 3/23/06] http://geology.usgs.gov/.

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