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Geomagnetism *

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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
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Abstract

What is geomagnetism, and how does it affect the earth? Visit the USGS Geomagnetism program for more information about this invisible force (USGS, 2006). How is the earth's magnetic field patterned? Are the magnetic poles located at the exact North and South Pole? How can the fields be mapped on the Earth's surface? What is declination? Use the mapping tools to study changes in declination patterns over time. (USGS, 2006)

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MLA Style

Science Buddies Staff. "Geomagnetism" Science Buddies. Science Buddies, 30 June 2014. Web. 22 Nov. 2014 <http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Geo_p029.shtml>

APA Style

Science Buddies Staff. (2014, June 30). Geomagnetism. Retrieved November 22, 2014 from http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Geo_p029.shtml

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Last edit date: 2014-06-30

Bibliography

USGS, 2006. "National Geomagnetism Program," United States Geological Survey (USGS) [accessed 3/23/06] http://geomag.usgs.gov/.

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