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Earth Surface Dynamics *

Difficulty
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
*Note: This is an abbreviated Project Idea, without notes to start your background research, a specific list of materials, or a procedure for how to do the experiment. You can identify abbreviated Project Ideas by the asterisk at the end of the title. If you want a Project Idea with full instructions, please pick one without an asterisk.

Abstract

Think about mountain ranges, canyons, sand dunes, or any other interesting geological feature you may live near enough to visit. The surface of the Earth is always changing due to a balance of forces both above and below the surface. Below-surface forces cause the Earth's crust to be faulted, folded, tilted, and lifted. Above-surface forces are primarily due to the natural processes of weathering and erosion. Can you show the effects of these forces using scale models, demonstrations, computational models, maps or geological databases? How do forces both above and below the surface create geological features? What is the difference between weathering and erosion? What is the difference between features that form due to natural processes of erosion and environmentally destructive processes of erosion? Are there factors that can help control erosion, like soil structure, vegetation or slope? Once rock has been broken up by weathering the small pieces can be moved by water, ice, wind, or gravity. Is the way a river changes a landscape different for slow and rapidly flowing rivers? How do glaciers change the landscape? How does gravity contribute to rock slides?

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MLA Style

Science Buddies Staff. "Earth Surface Dynamics" Science Buddies. Science Buddies, 30 June 2014. Web. 24 Nov. 2014 <http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Geo_p032.shtml>

APA Style

Science Buddies Staff. (2014, June 30). Earth Surface Dynamics. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Geo_p032.shtml

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Last edit date: 2014-06-30

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