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Data Models *

Difficulty
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
*Note: This is an abbreviated Project Idea, without notes to start your background research, a specific list of materials, or a procedure for how to do the experiment. You can identify abbreviated Project Ideas by the asterisk at the end of the title. If you want a Project Idea with full instructions, please pick one without an asterisk.

Abstract

Math is used by many different types of scientists to model phenomenon and evaluate data from an experiment. By building mathematical models scientists can understand how different physical, chemical, and biological processes are affected by different variables. The most important tools are: making a graph to give a visual representation of the relationships between your variables and making an equation to give a way of computing the relationships between your variables. Find a source of data, either from an online database or from your own experiment, and make a mathematical model. Try to make a graph and an equation for your data. How good is it at predicting additional results? Is the relationship linear, dynamic, or exponential? Is your data positively or negatively correlated? Are there any outliers and how do you decide if you should get rid of them? Can you show how to use a graph to evaluate sources of error in an experiment? Can you use your model to propose a hypothesis or theory for the relationship? (Wattenburg, 1998)

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Science Buddies Staff. "Data Models" Science Buddies. Science Buddies, 10 Jan. 2013. Web. 1 Oct. 2014 <http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Math_p029.shtml>

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Science Buddies Staff. (2013, January 10). Data Models. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Math_p029.shtml

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Last edit date: 2013-01-10

Bibliography

Wattenburg, F., 1998. "Mathematical Modeling in a Real and Complex World," Mantana State University, Department of Mathematics. [accessed: 5/1/06] http://www.math.montana.edu/frankw/ccp/modeling/topic.htm

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