Home Store Project Ideas Project Guide Ask An Expert Blog Careers Teachers Parents Students

Build a Gauss Rifle!

Difficulty
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Specialty items including neodymium magnets and steel ball bearings are needed for this project. See the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety A Gauss rifle can produce high velocity projectiles. Do not aim the gun at anyone or anything; do not put your hand in front of the projectile. Operate the Gauss rifle safely. Be sure to read the important safety notes at the beginning of the Experimental Procedure before you begin. Scissors or other metal objects may be attracted to the magnets; use caution when using metal objects near the magnets.

Abstract

What can you do with magnets and ball bearings that makes a lot of noise? Why, build a magnetic rifle, called a Gauss rifle, of course! Now, this rifle is not a weapon, but a way for you to learn a lot more about physics concepts, like momentum. In this physics science project, you will investigate how far a ball bearing launched by a Gauss rifle will fly, depending on how many magnetic acceleration stages are in the rifle and the ball bearing's initial velocity. This science project makes for a really cool visual demonstration.

Objective

In this science project, you will build a Gauss rifle and determine the effect the number of magnet stages has on the flight distance and velocity of ball bearings.

Credits

Terik Daly and Michelle Maranowski, PhD, Science Buddies

This science project is based upon the following Science Buddies Clever Scientist Award winning project: Agajanian, L. (2010). Gauss Rifle Magnetic Linear Accelerator.

  • Elmer's® is a registered trademark of Elmer's Products, Inc.

Cite This Page

MLA Style

Science Buddies Staff. "Build a Gauss Rifle!" Science Buddies. Science Buddies, 13 Nov. 2014. Web. 21 Dec. 2014 <http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Phys_p081.shtml?from=Blog>

APA Style

Science Buddies Staff. (2014, November 13). Build a Gauss Rifle!. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Phys_p081.shtml?from=Blog

Share your story with Science Buddies!

I did this project I Did This Project! Please log in and let us know how things went.


Last edit date: 2014-11-13

Introduction

Have you ever played with magnets, sticking them together and pulling them apart? Maybe you have seen how magnets attract paper clips and pins? Have you ever felt that tug when you tried to remove something from the magnet? If you have, then you have experienced the effects of magnetic fields. A magnetic field is a force that comes from a magnet, and it is either attractive (meaning it attracts) or repulsive (meaning it repels). A magnetic field is a force, just like gravity, and it can have magnitude and direction.

You might be thinking, "Great, magnets have magnetic fields, so what? What kinds of things can I do with magnets, other than just sticking them to stuff?" Well, it turns out that magnetic fields are used in all kinds of things, like circuits, motors, compasses, and MRI equipment. In this physics science project, you will see a magnetic field at work and use it to make a neat toy called a Gauss rifle. This rifle is named after Carl Gauss, who discovered the equations that describe magnetic accelerators, including the Gauss rifle. Don't worry; this rifle is not used to shoot things but to demonstrate physics principles like magnetism, and others that are discussed below.

A Gauss rifle is made up of at least one magnet stage, but it could have several successive magnet stages. A magnet stage is a magnet with several ball bearings touching it on one side. The first magnet stage in this science project will have another ball bearing on its other side, which we will call the "trigger" ball. To get the Gauss rifle to shoot a ball bearing, the trigger ball rolls toward the first magnet stage and then hits the first magnet. This starts a chain reaction that ends with the last ball bearing being ejected from the gun. Watch the video below to see a Gauss rifle in action.


Watch this video and see a cool demonstration of a one-magnet stage Gauss rifle.
Watch this video and see a cool demonstration of a one-magnet stage Gauss rifle. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZmCJ5eZlmo

So how does a Gauss rifle work? When you give the trigger ball a slight nudge, it moves forward. As it gets closer to the neodymium magnet, the magnetic field pulls the ball toward the magnet. The ball bearing accelerates toward the magnet due to the magnetic field. When the trigger ball bearing hits the magnet, it transfers its energy and momentum to the magnet. Without moving, the magnet then transfers the momentum from the trigger ball to the first ball bearing on opposite side of the magnet. This concept is called conservation of momentum. The ball bearing then hits the ball bearing next to it and momentum keeps getting transferred until the last ball bearing shoots off. In a rifle with more than one magnet stage, the magnetic field from the second magnet attracts this last ball bearing, the ball bearing accelerates toward the second magnet, and the process starts again. The only difference is that the ball bearing from the previous magnet stage gives the second magnet more energy than the ball bearing that started the chain reaction.

So how fast is the final ball bearing going when it leaves the rifle? What is its velocity? How far will it go? In this physics science project, you will answer these questions and look at how the velocity of the final ball bearing depends on the number of magnet stages. The distance that the ball travels will depend on how fast the ball was going when it was shot, as well as on gravity— the force that attracts everything on Earth— which will eventually pull the ball down. The Gauss rifle is not only a great toy for demonstration, but also a cool way to gain a whole lot of physics knowledge.

Terms and Concepts

  • Magnetic field
  • Force
  • Magnitude
  • Acceleration
  • Energy
  • Momentum
  • Conservation of momentum
  • Velocity
  • Gravity
  • Data
  • Square root
  • Trajectory

Questions

  • What is a magnet and what are some magnetic materials?
  • What is the difference between velocity and acceleration?
  • What is conservation of momentum and what are Newton's laws of motion?

Bibliography

These sources go into more detail about the physics of horizontally launched projectiles, the kind of physics that will help you understand how far a ball bearing launched by the Gauss rifle will travel.

News Feed on This Topic

 
, ,
Reading level:
Note: A computerized matching algorithm suggests the above articles. It's not as smart as you are, and it may occasionally give humorous, ridiculous, or even annoying results! Learn more about the News Feed

Materials and Equipment Product Kit Available

These specialty items can be purchased from the Science Buddies Store:
  • Build a Gauss Rifle kit (1). Includes:
    • Wooden dowels, 16 inches long and ⅜ inch diameter (2)
    • Neodymium magnets, ½ inch thick and ½ inch diameter (4)
    • Nickel-plated steel balls, ½ inch in diameter (10)
You will also need to gather these items:
  • Elmer's® Carpenter's Wood Glue
  • Clear tape, ½ inch in diameter
  • Plastic box, approximately the size of a shoe box
  • Sand, 2 cups
  • Tape measure (metric)
  • Table in front of which there is ample room and will not be a lot of foot traffic
  • Calculator with square root function. Alternatively you can use an online calculator like ecalc.com
  • Lab notebook

Disclaimer: Science Buddies occasionally provides information (such as part numbers, supplier names, and supplier weblinks) to assist our users in locating specialty items for individual projects. The information is provided solely as a convenience to our users. We do our best to make sure that part numbers and descriptions are accurate when first listed. However, since part numbers do change as items are obsoleted or improved, please send us an email if you run across any parts that are no longer available. We also do our best to make sure that any listed supplier provides prompt, courteous service. Science Buddies does participate in affiliate programs with Amazon.comsciencebuddies, Carolina Biological, and AquaPhoenix Education. Proceeds from the affiliate programs help support Science Buddies, a 501( c ) 3 public charity. If you have any comments (positive or negative) related to purchases you've made for science fair projects from recommendations on our site, please let us know. Write to us at scibuddy@sciencebuddies.org.

Order Product Supplies

Buy Kit
Project Kit: $29.95

Share your story with Science Buddies!

I did this project I Did This Project! Please log in and let us know how things went.

Experimental Procedure

Safety Notes about Neodymium Magnets:

  • Handle magnets carefully. Neodymium magnets (used in this science project) are strongly attracted and snap together quickly. Keep fingers and other body parts clear to avoid getting severely pinched.
  • Keep magnets away from electronics. The strong magnetic fields of neodymium magnets can erase magnetic media like credit cards, magnetic I.D. cards, and video tapes. It can also damage electronics like TVs, VCRs, computer monitors, and other CRT displays.
  • Keep magnets away from young children and pets. These small magnets pose a choking hazard and can cause internal damage if swallowed.
  • Avoid use around people with pacemakers. The strong magnetic field of neodymium magnets can disrupt the operation of pacemakers and similar medical devices. Never use neodymium magnets near persons with these devices.
  • Use the magnets gently. Neodymium magnets are more brittle than other types of magnets and can crack or chip. Do not try to machine (cut) them. To reduce the chance of chipping, avoid slamming them together. Eye protection should be worn if you are snapping them together at high speeds, as small shards may be launched at high speeds. Do not burn them; burning will create toxic fumes.
  • Be patient when separating the magnets. If you need to separate neodymium magnets, they can usually be separated by hand, one at a time, by sliding the end magnet off the stack. If you cannot separate them this way, try using the edge of a table or a countertop. Place the magnets on a tabletop with one of the magnets hanging over the edge. Then, using your body weight, hold the stack of magnets on the table and push down with the palm of your hand on the magnet hanging over the edge. With a little work and practice, you should be able to slide the magnets apart. Just be careful that they do not snap back together, pinching you, once you have separated them.
  • Wear eye protection. Neodymium magnets are brittle and may crack or shatter if they slam together, possibly launching magnet fragments at high speeds.

Building the Slide for the Rifle

  1. You are going to use the two wooden dowels to make a slide on which the magnets and balls will sit on and move down.
  2. Place the dowels evenly next to each other and make sure the ends are flush (lined up). Use clear tape to tape the dowels together at both ends. The tape will temporarily hold them together.
  3. Place the taped dowels on the table and then carefully glue them together with wood glue. Try to prevent the glue from leaking through to the other side.
  4. Let the glue dry (this may take a few hours, depending on the humidity) and then take the pieces of tape off.

Setting Up the Experiment

  1. Place the wood slide on the table with the glued side down. Put one neodymium magnet on the slide, toward one end. Place two ball bearings on one side of the magnets such that the last ball is at the end of slide. See Figure 1. This step is represented by the magnet and ball bearings on right edge of the table in the figure.


Schematic of a single stage Gauss rifle.

Figure 1. A one-magnet stage Gauss rifle.



  1. Now wrap a piece of tape around the magnet so that the ends of the tape wrap around the wood slide. Remove the ball bearings.
    1. Troubleshooting Tip: If you have problems with the magnet pulling out from the tape or with the tape breaking, then add a second layer of tape for reinforcement.
  2. Place the wood slide on the table so that the end of the slide is flush with the end of the table. See Figure 1.
  3. Place two ball bearings on one side of the magnet, at the end of the slide (where they were located in step 1).
  4. Pour the sand in the plastic box and smooth it out so that the sand is approximately level. Place the box on the floor a couple of feet away from the edge of the table.
  5. Place one ball bearing on the other side of the magnet, about 5 centimeters (cm) from the magnet. This is the trigger ball. See Figure 2.


Photo of a one-stage Gauss rifle; note the the two ball bearings touching the magnet stage.

Figure 2. A one-stage Gauss rifle. Note the two ball bearings touching the magnet stage at the end of the slide (as described in step 4) and the single ball bearing (the trigger ball) 5 cm behind the magnet stage (as described in step 6).



  1. Measure the height of the table, in meters (m), on which the Gauss rifle is sitting. Record this value in your lab notebook.

Shooting the One Magnet Stage Gauss Rifle

  1. Practice shooting the Gauss rifle so that you can place the plastic box at the correct distance for accurate measurements, as follows. Your experiment will look something like Figure 1.
    1. Lift the slide just a little to get the trigger ball rolling toward the magnet. Keep an eye on the last ball and watch where it lands so that you know where to place the plastic box. Caution: Be sure there is nothing breakable and nobody in front of the setup before you begin testing.
    2. Place the box so that the ball will land approximately in the middle of the plastic box.
  2. Now make a data table, like the one below, in your lab notebook so you can record the data that you get from your experiments.
Height of table (m)= __________
Number of Magnet Stages Trial Distance the Ball Traveled (m)
1 1  
2 
3 
4 
5 
2 1  
2 
3 
4 
5 
3 1  
2 
3 
4 
5 
4 1  
2 
3 
4 
5 
  1. Replace the correct number of balls on either side of the magnet.
    1. Troubleshooting Tip: You may find it helpful to stabilize the magnet with one hand while repositioning the ball bearings. This keeps the tape holding the magnet to the wooden dowels from stretching or breaking as you reset the rifle. It is often easier to reset the rifle by sliding the ball bearings around the magnets instead of trying to pull them off the magnets.
  2. Now lift the slide just a little to get the trigger ball rolling toward the magnet. After the launched ball lands, take the tape measure and measure the horizontal distance from the edge of the table to the spot where the ball first landed in the box. Record this distance in meters (m) in the data table in your lab notebook.
    1. Troubleshooting Tip: Sometimes the ball bearing will roll or bounce after it first hits the sand. You want to measure the distance from the edge of the table to where the ball first hit the sand, not the distance from the edge of the table to where the ball finally comes to rest. See Figure 3.


Ball bearing landing in sand pit after being launched from a gauss rifle.

Figure 3. In this case, the launched ball bearing landed in the crater at left, then bounced and slid to where it finally stopped at the right side of the box. The tape measure is positioned to start measuring from the circular crater at left—the place where the ball bearing first hit the sand.



  1. Retrieve the ball from the box, smooth the sand, and replace the ball in its original position on the slide.
  2. Repeat steps 4-5 four more times for a total of five trials. It is a good idea to repeat your experiments to make sure that your data is reproducible and accurate.

Shooting a Multiple Stage Gauss Rifle

  1. You now have data for a one-magnet stage Gauss rifle. But what happens when you have more than one magnet stage?
  2. Build a two-magnet stage Gauss rifle. Remove the ball bearings from the rifle. Place the second magnet stage 10 cm to the left of the first magnet stage (as measured from the front of the first magnet stage to the front of the second magnet stage) and tape it to the wood slide. Cut off any excess tape, if needed. See Figure 4.
    1. Troubleshooting Tip: Depending on the strength of your magnets, 10 cm between stages may not be enough space. If you have problems with the magnet stages pulling together (instead of staying separated) due to their magnetic attraction, simply increase the spacing between magnet stages. If you do change the spacing, be sure to use the same spacing between all of the magnet stages in your Gauss rifle.


Photo of two magnets spaced along a wooden dowel.

Figure 4. The magnet stages are spaced 10 cm apart, as measured from the front of the first magnet stage (at right) and the front of the second magnet stage (at left).



  1. Now place two ball bearings on one side of each magnet stage. Place the trigger ball 5 cm to the left of the second magnet. Figure 5 shows how to arrange the magnets and ball bearings.


Photo of a four-stage Gauss rifle with the 'trigger' ball bearing.

Figure 5. A four-stage Gauss rifle with the "trigger" ball bearing 5 cm to the left of the fourth stage. A two-stage rifle has two magnet stages, with the "trigger" ball bearing 5 cm from the second stage. Similarly, a three-stage rifle has three magnet stages, with the "trigger" ball bearing 5 cm from the third stage. In each case, the magnet stages are 10 cm apart from one another.



  1. Practice shooting the Gauss rifle so that you can place the plastic box at the correct distance for accurate measurements.
    1. Lift the slide just a little to get the trigger ball rolling toward the magnet. Keep an eye on the launched ball and watch where it lands so you know where to place the plastic box.
    2. Place the box so that the launched ball will land approximately in the middle of the box.
  2. Retrieve the ball from the box, smooth the sand, reset the rifle, and replace the launched ball in its original position on the slide.
  3. Lift the slide a tiny amount to get the trigger ball rolling toward the magnet. After the launched ball lands, take the tape measure and measure the horizontal distance from the edge of the table to the spot where the ball first landed in the box. Record this distance in meters (m) in the data table in your lab notebook.
  4. Repeat steps 5-6 four more times for a total of five trials. It is important to repeat your experiments to make sure that your data is reproducible and accurate.
  5. Repeat steps 2-7 for a three-magnet stage Gauss rifle. Remember to record all data in your data table in your lab notebook.
  6. Repeat steps 2-7 for a four-magnet stage Gauss rifle. Remember to record all data in your data table in your lab notebook.

Analyzing the Data

  1. Now review the data you collected in the previous two sections.
  2. Create a plot showing the relationship between distance traveled and the number of magnet stages.
  3. Now use Equation 1 to calculate the velocity at which the ball was launched from the wood slide (the Gauss rifle). Record your results in a table, like the one shown below.
    1. Troubleshooting Tip: Make sure that you use consistent units in your calculations. If you measured the table height and distance traveled in units other than meters, you will need to convert those measurements to meters.

Equation 1:

Velocity (m/second) = Horizontal distance between the table and the ball (m) X Square root of
(gravitational acceleration (m/second2) divided by [2 X height of the table (m)])

V = D (√   g   )
2h
  • V = Velocity of ball ejected from rifle, in meters/second (m/s)
  • D = Horizontal distance between the edge of the table and where the ball landed, in meters (m)
  • g = Gravitational acceleration which is 9.8 meters/(second squared)
  • h = Height of table, in meters (m).
Number of Magnet Stages Trial Distance the Ball Traveled (m) Velocity of the Ejected Ball (m/s)
1 1    
2  
3  
4  
5  
2 1    
2  
3  
4  
5  
3 1    
2  
3  
4  
5  
4 1    
2  
3  
4  
5  
  1. Average the data from the table above. Average the velocity for each magnet stage (1, 2, 3, or 4) over the five trials. Record your data in a table like the one shown below.
Number of Magnet Stages Average Velocity of the Ejected Ball (m/s)
1 
2 
3 
4 
  1. Now make a plot of the average velocity dependent upon the number of magnet stages. Label the x-axis Magnet Stages and the y-axis Average Velocity.
  2. What do the plots that you made tell you? How is velocity affected by the increase in magnet stages?

Troubleshooting

For troubleshooting tips, please read our FAQ: Build a Gauss Rifle!.

Share your story with Science Buddies!

I did this project I Did This Project! Please log in and let us know how things went.


Variations

  • Buy additional components and incrementally increase the number of magnet stages until you get to eight magnet stages. Does the velocity increase or decrease with the increase in magnet stages?
  • Try increasing the distance between magnet stages. How does this affect velocity?
  • Science Buddies Kit: What happens if you use only one ¼" thick magnet in each magnet stage, instead of two?
  • Equation 1 does not account for the effect of air resistance. How do you think air resistance affects the distance and trajectory that the ball bearing will travel? Check out the references listed in the Bibliography for more information on how to derive equation 1.

Share your story with Science Buddies!

I did this project I Did This Project! Please log in and let us know how things went.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

If you are having trouble with this project, please read the FAQ below. You may find the answer to your question.
Q: These neodymium magnets are pretty strong. How do you separate them?
A: They can usually be separated by hand one at a time by sliding the end magnet off the stack. If you cannot separate them this way, try using the edge of a table or a countertop. Place the magnets on a tabletop with one of the magnets hanging over the edge. Then, using your body weight, hold the stack of magnets on the table and push down with the palm of your hand on the magnet hanging over the edge. With a little work and practice, you should be able to slide the magnets apart. Just be careful that they do not snap back together once you have separated them.
Q: The tape holding the magnets to the wooden dowel broke or came off. How can I prevent that?
A: The tape could be breaking for a few reasons. First, the stress of pulling a ball bearing off the magnets might sometimes be enough to break the tape. Second, the force of a ball bearing hitting the magnet might occasionally be strong enough to break or detach the tape. Third, if the magnets are too close together, then the attraction between magnets might be strong enough to break the tape. The third scenario is unlikely with a single-magnet stage Gauss rifle.

Single-Magnet Stage Rifle. If the tape broke while you were working with a single-magnet stage Gauss rifle, then it was probably from the stress of adjusting or resetting the ball bearings. Try reinforcing the tape by adding a second (or even a third) layer of tape to secure the magnets to the dowels. You can also use a longer piece of tape to wrap completely around the dowels and magnets. In addition, you can reduce the stress on the tape by sliding the ball bearings off the magnets, instead of pulling them straight off. Another way to decrease the stress on the tape is to hold the magnet with one hand while you remove and replace the ball bearings with the other hand.

Multi-Magnet Stage Rifle. If the tape broke while you were working with a multi-stage Gauss rifle, think about when the tape broke. Did it break while you were setting or resetting the Gauss rifle? Or did the tape break suddenly when you were not handling the rifle?
  • It broke while I was setting or resetting the Gauss rifle. If the tape broke while you were setting or resetting the rifle, then it was probably from the stress of adjusting or moving the ball bearings. Try reinforcing the tape by adding a second (or even a third) layer of tape to secure the magnets to the dowels. You can also use a longer piece of tape to wrap all the way around the dowels and magnets. In addition, you can decrease the stress on the tape by sliding ball bearings off the magnets, instead of pulling them straight off. Another way to decrease the stress on the tape is to hold the magnet with one hand while you remove and replace the ball bearings with the other hand.

  • It broke suddenly while the Gauss rifle was resting on the table. If the tape broke suddenly while the rifle was resting on the table, then the problem might be that the magnets are too close together, especially if they snapped together after the tape broke. Check to make sure the magnets are the correct distance apart (10 cm; see Figure 4 in the Experimental Procedure). If they are 10 cm away from each other, but you still have this problem, move the magnets slightly farther apart, retape them (using a couple of layers of tape for added strength), and try the experiment again.
Q: The tape is not breaking, but the magnets are slipping out of the tape. What can I do to stop that?
A: This is due to the same factors as in the problems described in question number 2. Try the troubleshooting steps and techniques discussed in that section.
Q: The magnet stages in my multi-stage Gauss rifle are so attracted to each other that they stick together before I can tape them in place. What can I do about this?
A: The magnets will be attracted to each other if they are placed too close together. Make sure that your magnet stages are the correct distance (10 cm) apart (see Figure 4 in the Experimental Procedure). If the magnets are 10 cm apart but you still have problems with them coming together before you can tape them in place, gradually increase the space between each of the magnets until they stay where you put them. Whatever spacing you settle on, put the same amount of space between all the magnet stages in your Gauss rifle.
Q: The trigger ball rolls toward the magnet stage and fires the rifle before I can lift the slide. How do I stop this?
A: The trigger ball will roll to the magnet before you can lift the slide if the trigger ball and magnet are too close together. Make sure the trigger ball is the correct distance (5 cm) behind the magnet (see Figure 2 in the Experimental Procedure). If the trigger ball is 5 cm away from the magnet and you still have this problem, try increasing the space between the trigger ball and magnet until the ball stays in place. Measure this distance, and use this same spacing each time you fire the Gauss rifle.
Q: The launched ball bearing rolls, bounces, slides, or moves around after it lands in the sand. If this happens, where should I start measuring the horizontal distance traveled by the ball bearing?
A: Measure the horizontal distance from the edge of the table to where the ball bearing first hits the sand, not the location where the ball bearing comes to rest. See Figure 3 in the Experimental Procedure.
Q: I already have 1/4 inch thick magnets. Do I have to buy 1/2 inch thick ones or can I use the ones I have?
A: You can substitute eight 1/4 inch thick magnets for the four 1/2 inch thick magnets called for in the Procedure. For every stage, use two 1/4 inch magnets stuck together as shown in the picture below.
A one-stage Gauss rifle. Note the two ball bearings touching the magnet stage. Physics science project

Ask an Expert

The Ask an Expert Forum is intended to be a place where students can go to find answers to science questions that they have been unable to find using other resources. If you have specific questions about your science fair project or science fair, our team of volunteer scientists can help. Our Experts won't do the work for you, but they will make suggestions, offer guidance, and help you troubleshoot.

Ask an Expert

Contact Us

If you have purchased a kit for this project from Science Buddies, we are pleased to answer any question not addressed by the FAQ above.

In your email, please follow these instructions:
  1. What is your Science Buddies kit order number?
  2. Please describe how you need help as thoroughly as possible:

    Examples

    Good Question I'm trying to do Experimental Procedure step #5, "Scrape the insulation from the wire. . ." How do I know when I've scraped enough?
    Good Question I'm at Experimental Procedure step #7, "Move the magnet back and forth . . ." and the LED is not lighting up.
    Bad Question I don't understand the instructions. Help!
    Good Question I am purchasing my materials. Can I substitute a 1N34 diode for the 1N25 diode called for in the material list?
    Bad Question Can I use a different part?

Contact Us

Related Links

If you like this project, you might enjoy exploring these related careers:

Female physicist working

Physicist

Physicists have a big goal in mind—to understand the nature of the entire universe and everything in it! To reach that goal, they observe and measure natural events seen on Earth and in the universe, and then develop theories, using mathematics, to explain why those phenomena occur. Physicists take on the challenge of explaining events that happen on the grandest scale imaginable to those that happen at the level of the smallest atomic particles. Their theories are then applied to human-scale projects to bring people new technologies, like computers, lasers, and fusion energy. Read more
NASA material scientist

Materials Scientist and Engineer

What makes it possible to create high-technology objects like computers and sports gear? It's the materials inside those products. Materials scientists and engineers develop materials, like metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites, that other engineers need for their designs. Materials scientists and engineers think atomically (meaning they understand things at the nanoscale level), but they design microscopically (at the level of a microscope), and their materials are used macroscopically (at the level the eye can see). From heat shields in space, prosthetic limbs, semiconductors, and sunscreens to snowboards, race cars, hard drives, and baking dishes, materials scientists and engineers make the materials that make life better. Read more
aerospace engineer testing airplane model in transonic pressure tunnel

Aerospace Engineer

Humans have always longed to fly and to make other things fly, both through the air and into outer space—aerospace engineers are the people that make those dreams come true. They design, build, and test vehicles like airplanes, helicopters, balloons, rockets, missiles, satellites, and spacecraft. Read more
Mechanical engineer building prototype

Mechanical Engineer

Mechanical engineers are part of your everyday life, designing the spoon you used to eat your breakfast, your breakfast's packaging, the flip-top cap on your toothpaste tube, the zipper on your jacket, the car, bike, or bus you took to school, the chair you sat in, the door handle you grasped and the hinges it opened on, and the ballpoint pen you used to take your test. Virtually every object that you see around you has passed through the hands of a mechanical engineer. Consequently, their skills are in demand to design millions of different products in almost every type of industry. Read more

News Feed on This Topic

 
, ,
Reading level:
Note: A computerized matching algorithm suggests the above articles. It's not as smart as you are, and it may occasionally give humorous, ridiculous, or even annoying results! Learn more about the News Feed

Looking for more science fun?

Try one of our science activities for quick, anytime science explorations. The perfect thing to liven up a rainy day, school vacation, or moment of boredom.

Find an Activity