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Hurricanes *

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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
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Abstract

Unless you live in the Southern states, you only hear about the most destructive hurricanes. In fact hurricanes occur every year, even multiple times a year. Each hurricane is a tropical storm related to cyclones and tornadoes, some big and some small. Each hurricane is measured based upon several variables like: wind speed, diameter, direction of movement and speed of movement. Does the size of the hurricane correlate with the wind speed? What information can the eye of the hurricane provide? Are hurricanes more likely during certain times of the year? Do hurricanes only occur in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean? Are there other regions where hurricanes occur? Is the direction of the hurricane always the same (clockwise or counterclockwise)? Does the direction of the hurricane depend on the hemisphere where the hurricane occurs? (NCAR, 2006; NOAA, 2006; Weather Underground, 2006; WMO, 2006)

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MLA Style

Science Buddies Staff. "Hurricanes" Science Buddies. Science Buddies, 30 June 2014. Web. 21 Aug. 2014 <http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Weather_p026.shtml>

APA Style

Science Buddies Staff. (2014, June 30). Hurricanes. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Weather_p026.shtml

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Last edit date: 2014-06-30

Bibliography

  • NCAR, 2006. "NCAR Science and Education Outreach Page," National Center for Atmospheric Research. [accessed: 3/1/2006]
    http://eo.ucar.edu/.
  • NOAA, 2006. "NOAA Homepage," National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. [accessed: 3/1/2006] http://www.noaa.gov/.
  • The Weather Underground, Inc, 2005. "The Weather Underground," Ann Arbor, MI. [accessed: 12/13/05] http://www.wunderground.com/.
  • WMO, 2006. "World Meteorological Organization," WMO, United Nations. [accessed: 3/1/2006] http://www.wmo.ch/index-en.html.

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