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Science Fair Project Idea
thumbnail It's true that the light from the Sun provides the heat and light we need to survive here on Earth, but it also poses a threat. Ultraviolet (UV) rays in sunlight cause damage that can lead to early skin aging and even skin cancer. In this science fair project, find out when you need the most protection from UV rays by using a personal UV monitor to measure how the level of ultraviolet light changes during different parts of the day. Read more
HumBio_p028
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability You will need to order a personal UV monitor online. Please see the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Do not look at the Sun when you are measuring the UV level. Wear sunscreen when you are in the sunlight.
Science Fair Project Idea
Though the Sun provides heat and light, which are essential for life on Earth, ultraviolet (UV) rays in sunlight can cause damage to DNA. In this science fair project, you will experiment with a strain of yeast that is super-sensitive to UV light. This project will demonstrate the lethal effects of UV light when DNA damage is not repaired. Read more
BioChem_p036
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability You will need to order a UV-sensitive yeast kit online. See the Materials and Equipment list for details. Note: You might have to have the yeast delivered to a school if the company does not deliver to residential addresses.
Cost High ($100 - $150)
Safety Pouring hot agar plates should be done with caution.
News Article
EurekAlert!
May 2, 2013
thumbnail Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified a gene that, when repressed in tumor cells, puts a halt to cell growth and a range of processes needed for tumors to enlarge and spread to distant sites. The researchers hope that this so-called "master regulator" gene may be the key to developing a new treatment for tumors resistant to current drugs. Read more
News Article
EurekAlert!
December 3, 2013
thumbnail Immuno targeting and delivery mechanisms are a central part of advancing the role of nanotechnology in cancer imaging and therapy, and this will be the focus of speakers for this annual symposium. Invited speakers will cover a range of topics in engineering proteins for targeted delivery and packaging. Immune targeting and modulation will also be discussed as it relates to the eventual role of nanotechnology in cancer. Participants are welcome to register and bring posters, to be viewed at a… Read more
Ask an Expert Topic
Cancer testing Cancer testing Hello, I am doing a project about cancer, using a compound (my partner doesn't want me to say it) that is normally used intravenously. I was wondering how we could test this on cancer cells and where we could get these cancer cells from. Re: Cancer testing Hi, Welcome to Science Buddies! This sounds like a great project. The best way to test a novel compound to see if it effective against cancer cells would be with cells grown in tissue culture http Read more
News Article
EurekAlert!
February 26, 2013
thumbnail A microscopy technique developed at the University of Akron could be key to improving cancer treatments with targeted therapeutic drugs. Read more
News Article
EurekAlert!
April 4, 2013
thumbnail Researchers studying a set of proteins that regulate physiology, caloric restriction and aging have discovered another important role that one of them plays. SIRT4, one of seven sirtuin proteins, is known for controlling fuel usage from its post in the mitochondria, the cell's energy source. It responds to stressful changes in the availability of nutrients for the cell. Read more
News Article
EurekAlert!
November 2, 2012
thumbnail PAHs are common environmental pollutants found in automobile exhaust, barbequed foods and tobacco smoke. These molecules are converted into carcinogens in the body that attack DNA and cause cancer-inducing mutations. Read more
Ask an Expert Topic
Plant cancer Plant cancer Hi! My name is Tony and I am currently working on a science fair project with my partner. It is about finding a possible preventive anti-carcinogen for plant cancer caused by the Agrobacterium Tumefaciens bacteria (crown gall). I will first expose healthy bean plants to an anti-carcinogen extract (turmeric, oregano, and Vitamin C) and then give it the cancer. I will see the percent of plants that get prevented from the cancer. However, I have some questions about my Read more
News Article
EurekAlert!
February 24, 2012
thumbnail Cancer vaccines target specific tumor antigens yet spare the immune suppressive effects of radiation and chemotherapy. This symposium reviews the current approaches in cancer immunotherapy, immunomodulation, and highlights emerging cancer vaccines. Read more
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