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Electricity & Electronics Project Ideas

Science Fair Project Idea
Electric paint is a fun way to include a circuit with lights in an art project, but it presents a challenge not found in traditional electronic circuits. What happens if you change the length or width of your strokes of paint, such as by painting longer, curvier lines or using a thicker brush? Could this affect the electrical properties of your circuit? Try this project to find out! Read more
Elec_p086
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites To do this project, you will need to use a multimeter. See the Science Buddies reference [# ProjectGuide Name="Advanced.ElectronicsPrimerMultimeter" Value="HtmlAnchor" #] to learn how to use one.
Material Availability This project requires special circuit materials. See the Materials and Equipment list for details. "Time required" includes time for shipping specialty materials.
Cost Average ($40 - $80)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
A tried and true balloon activity is to rub a balloon on your head to make your hair stand up. How does the rubbing build up static electricity? Do this experiment to see if the number of rubs makes a difference. Read more
Elec_p017
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
Do you like playing with squishy Play-Doh® or modeling clay? Wouldn't it be cool if you could add lights, sound, or even motion to your Play Doh creations? In this project, you will use Play Doh that conducts electricity, which will allow you to connect lights, motors, and buzzers to your sculptures! This project is the first in a three-part series on "squishy circuits," which can all be done with the same materials. We recommend doing the projects in order. Read more
Elec_p073
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability This project requires a Squishy Circuits Kit. See the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Never connect the battery pack's terminals directly to each other; this is called a short circuit and can make the batteries and wires get very hot. Do not connect the LEDs directly to the battery pack without using Play Doh; this will burn out the LEDs.
Science Fair Project Idea
Electricity powers many of the devices we use every day, from lights to video games and computers. Engineers have to use certain materials to make electrical devices work. In this experiment, you will find out which materials let electricity flow through them (conductors) and which ones prevent electricity from flowing through them (insulators). Read more
Elec_p018
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability For your convenience, a kit is available for this project from the . Estimated project time includes time for shipping the kit.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Short circuits can get very hot and present a burn hazard. Never connect the positive and negative ends (red and black wires) of the battery pack directly to each other.
Science Fair Project Idea
Did you know that not all trains run on tracks? Some of the world's fastest trains are magnetic levitation trains (maglev). This means that the carriage of the train is suspended over the rails with no support, but only with magnetic fields! There is a physical explanation for magnetic levitation, and if you would like to learn more about magnetism and current, this is a science fair project that you must try! Read more
Elec_p053
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability This project requires a neodymium magnet. See the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Adult supervision is required for using neodymium magnets. See the Procedure for more detailed information.
Science Fair Project Idea
What do you do with your old wooden pencils when they get too short to hold? Don't throw them away; you can use them to make circuits! This project will show you how to use pencils to make resistors, an important part of many electrical circuits, and test how they affect the brightness of a lightbulb in a simple circuit. Read more
Elec_p013
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability A kit for this project is available from the . Estimated project time includes time for shipping the kit.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Short circuits can get very hot and present a burn hazard. Never connect the positive and negative ends (red and black wires) of the battery pack directly to each other. Adult supervision is required for cutting the pencils.
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you tried our , and now you are looking for more to do? Do you want to learn more about circuits and add even more lights? Check out this project for part 2 of our Squishy Circuit series! Read more
Elec_p074
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites You should understand the Introduction material in [# ProjectIdea Name="Elec_p073" Value="HtmlAnchor" HtmlText="Light Up Your Play Dough!" HtmlHash="background" #]—the first project in the "Squishy Circuits" series—before doing this project.
Material Availability This project requires a Squishy Circuits Kit. See the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Never connect the battery pack's terminals directly to each other; this is called a short circuit and can make the batteries and wires get very hot. Do not connect the LEDs directly to the battery pack without using play dough; this will burn out the LEDs.
Science Fair Project Idea
You've seen that a magnet's attractive force can cause a small object (like a paper clip) to "jump" to the magnet. So a magnetic field can act through the air, but what about other materials? Here's an experiment you can do to find out. You'll need a strong bar magnet, a stack of books, a paper clip, some thread and tape. Place the bar magnet underneath the top book in your stack, so that it sticks out. Tie a piece of thread (as long as the stack of books is high) to a paper clip. You… Read more
Elec_p042
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Science Fair Project Idea
This is a straightforward project that shows you how data can be digitized and stored on magnetic recording media. You'll learn how alpha-numeric characters are digitized, and you'll use bar magnets to represent the individual data "bits." You'll also learn about how much information can be stored in a small space (recording density), and how magnetic data can be erased. Read more
Elec_p026
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability A large number of specialty magnets are needed for this project.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
Dimmer switches let us control the brightness of a light, anywhere from completely off to full brightness. This can be nice when you want to set the brightness "just right," as opposed to a regular light switch that only lets you turn a light on or off. It turns out that you can make a dimmer switch out of an everyday object—a pencil! Try this project to find out how a dimmer switch can control the brightness of a light. Read more
Elec_p056
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability For your convenience a kit for this project is available at the . Estimated project time includes time for shipping the kit.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Short circuits can get very hot and present a burn hazard. Never connect the positive and negative ends (red and black wires) of the battery pack directly to each other. Adult supervision is required for whittling the pencil.
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