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Science Fair Project Idea
Digital cameras can be a great way to learn about photography. Most digital cameras today have LCD screens, so you get instant feedback on your photo. If you make a mistake, no problem, you just delete the picture. It's nice that you don't have to worry about the expense and bother of developing film! This project can help you learn to take better pictures. Read more
Photo_p014
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites You'll need a digital camera that take pictures in manual mode (a grayscale, or 'black-and-white' mode, is nice to have but not essential). You will need to know how to change the shutter speed, lens aperture, and ISO setting. A tripod for the camera is nice to have, but not absolutely essential. You will also need a computer.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
Wondering what sustainable, high-producing agriculture might look like? This science project explores how analyzing bird's-eye-view pictures of a field can make farmers aware of variations in their fields. Farmers can use this information to optimize their farming practices, or even feed this information to high-tech agricultural equipment so the machines can automatically adjust their actions (like fertilizing or watering) to the needs of a piece of land. Read more
EnvSci_p065
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites Familiarity with image-editing software, or willingness to learn it.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
The poet Carl Sandburg wrote, "The fog comes on little cat feet..." In this weather science fair project, you'll discover why this beautiful, quiet creeper appears on some days, and not on others. If you are fascinated by fog and weather conditions, this science fair project is for you! Read more
Weather_p028
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Long (1+ months)
Prerequisites Each morning around sunrise, you will need to make visual observations of a field, park, or other area with considerable plant matter within 10 minutes of your home.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
This is a cool way to learn more about your camera, and how to take better pictures. Read more
Photo_p001
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites Must have a camera
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
A strobe light can illuminate an entire room in just tens of microseconds. Inexpensive strobe lights can flash up to 10 or 20 times per second. This project shows you how to use stroboscopic photography to analyze motion. Read more
Photo_p003
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites This project requires camera with adjustable shutter speeds and lens apertures, a tripod and cable release.
Material Availability Specialty items
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety No hazards
Science Fair Project Idea
How do you feel when you ride your bike into a strong wind? Do your legs feel like lead? How about when the wind is at your back? Does that make you feel ready for the Tour de France? In this science fair project, you will investigate how wind-powered devices, like pinwheels, also react in different ways to the direction of the wind. Read more
Energy_p025
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever looked up at the stars at night and wondered how fast they were moving or how far away they were? By studying how the brightness of a star changes with distance, you can answer those questions. In this astronomy science project, you'll create a model of starlight and use Google's app with your smartphone or tablet to discover the key relationship between brightness and distance. Read more
Astro_p034
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
If you're like most people, you like listening to music. Have you ever wondered how your ears and your brain turn the sound waves out there in the world into the experience of music in your head? If you're interested in doing a project about how we hear, this is a good one for you. With this project, you'll do background research and make measurements to understand how the sensitivity of your own hearing varies with the pitch of the sound. Read more
HumBio_p011
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites Understanding of logarithms
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Average ($50 - $100)
Safety Use low volume when playing the sound files.
Science Fair Project Idea
Do you like to take pictures with a camera? It can be fun to capture important and humorous events in your life on film or on a memory card. Photography is a hobby that people of all ages enjoy because they can creatively express themselves both artistically and scientifically. But when did the science of photography start and have cameras always been such complicated pieces of equipment? In this photography science project, you will experiment with a simple camera called a pinhole camera and… Read more
Photo_p023
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites You should have access to a light meter. These can be quite expensive, so try to borrow a light meter from a photographer friend or from school.
Material Availability Special-order items required. See the Materials and Equipment list for more details.
Cost High ($100 - $150)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
In physics class, you have probably rolled your eyes at some point after being assigned a "projectile motion" homework problem where you use equations to predict how a ball will move through the air. This experiment will show you just how fun that problem can be by using a real catapult to launch a ball and videotaping it as it flies along its path. Then, you will analyze the video and compare it to what the equations predicted. If you have ever wondered if those equations in your physics… Read more
Phys_p089
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites This project requires a basic understanding of algebra, trigonometry (sine and cosine functions), and physics (kinematics—two-dimensional projectile motion), or the willingness to learn about these subjects on your own.
Material Availability This project requires access to a video camera (not included in the cost estimate) and the purchase of a catapult kit. (See the Materials and Equipment list for details.)
Cost Average ($40 - $80)
Safety Minor injury possible. Never aim the catapult at anyone, and keep your hands and fingers clear of the moving catapult arm when launching the catapult.
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