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Others Like “What Do Different Baking Ingredients Do?”

Science Fair Project Idea
Here's a project idea for all of you bakers out there. What happens if you try your favorite muffin recipe with different types of flour (e.g., white, whole wheat, rye, soy, etc.)? Think of ways you can measure the results. How would you measure the density of a muffin? A kitchen scale would definitely be useful for this project, both for measuring the results and for portioning out the batter for equal-sized muffins. What other measures might be of interest? (Nakajima, 2005) Read more
MatlSci_p029
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Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Science Fair Project Idea
Gluten is the substance in bread which, on a microscopic level, forms a rigid structure that traps the gases from the yeast, allowing the dough to rise. However, too much of the rigid gluten structure can make some doughs, like pie crust and pastry dough, too tough. For this reason, bakers often use different types of flour that naturally contain different amounts of gluten to make various types of dough. Do some background research about what gluten is, how it forms, and its role in baking.… Read more
FoodSci_p020
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Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
There's nothing quite like the smell of fresh-baked muffins for breakfast on a Saturday morning! If you're into baking, you might want to try this project, which will give you insight into some of the chemistry that's going on in your muffin batter. You'll get some practical knowledge about substituting ingredients. Who knows, it may even get you started on the path to some new culinary inventions! Read more
FoodSci_p008
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Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites Previous experience with baking is helpful, but not absolutely necessary.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Minor injury possible: hot oven.
Science Fair Project Idea
thumbnail If you like to bake, this could be a good science project for you! Have you ever wondered about the purpose of each of the ingredients in your favorite recipes? For example, why is baking powder used in some muffin recipes? How does the baking powder affect how the muffins look, feel, and taste? In this food science project you will use a scientific method to find out! Read more
FoodSci_p007
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Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites Previous experience with baking is helpful, but not absolutely necessary.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Minor injury possible: hot oven. Be sure to have an adult help when using the oven.
Science Fair Project Idea
thumbnail Have any of your friends or family members ever had an allergic reaction to eggs? In this science project idea, you'll investigate how to modify recipes so that even egg-allergic friends and family members can enjoy them. Read more
FoodSci_p002
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Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Adult supervision required when using the oven, stove, blender, or chopping ingredients.
Science Fair Project Idea
thumbnail Apple pie is one of America's traditional desserts. It can be enjoyed on its own or with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. The cool sweetness of the ice cream combines with the warm apples and flaky pastry to create a taste sensation. However, if the pastry that surrounds the apples is heavy or chewy then that can really affect how much you enjoy this treat. But how do you make a pastry that is light and flaky? In this cooking and food science fair project, you will find out by experimenting with… Read more
FoodSci_p055
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Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites You must have access to a refrigerator, an oven, and a stovetop.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Minor injury is possible.
Science Fair Project Idea
thumbnail Have you ever bitten in to a cookie and thought, "this is the best cookie in the whole wide world!"? Was it one you made at home? In this science fair project, discover if you can perfect the taste of your favorite cookie right in your own kitchen! Read more
FoodSci_p014
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Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety Adult assistance is needed to make the cookie dough and bake the cookies.
Science Fair Project Idea
Did you know that you can make a simple hygrometer (a device for measuring the relative humidity of the air) with hair? This type of hygrometer is easy to build (for instructions, see: ). Does the type of hair used in the hygrometer affect the accuracy of the results? Do some types of hair respond faster than others? Do some types of hair give a larger (or smaller) response? You could get hair samples from classmates, or a local beauty shop. Use hair samples of equal length to construct… Read more
MatlSci_p035
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Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Science Fair Project Idea
There are many types of construction materials used for wood-frame houses. Compare the different uses for and strengths of different building materials, e.g.: particle board, plywood, pine, oriented strand board (OSB), and drywall (gypsum board, SheetRock). The Science Buddies Materials Science Resource will be helpful for learning about different ways to measure material strength. You should be sure to use the same cross-sectional area of each material in order to make fair comparisons.… Read more
CE_p020
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Science Fair Project Idea
The rebound rating is the ratio of the height the ball bounces to, divided by the height the ball was dropped from. Use the rebound rating to measure the bounciness of new tennis balls vs. balls that have been used for 10, 20, 50, and 100 games. Another idea to explore: does it matter what type of court the ball is used on? (See: Goodstein, 1999, 63-64.) Read more
Sports_p039
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
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