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Others Like “Oil and Vinegar Do Mix…When You Have an Emulsifier”

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Science Fair Project Idea
There's nothing quite like the smell of fresh-baked muffins for breakfast on a Saturday morning! If you're into baking, you might want to try this project, which will give you insight into some of the chemistry that's going on in your muffin batter. You'll get some practical knowledge about substituting ingredients. Who knows, it may even get you started on the path to some new culinary inventions! Read more
FoodSci_p008
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Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites Previous experience with baking is helpful, but not absolutely necessary.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Minor injury possible: hot oven.
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever bitten into a slice of bread only to find that it no longer seems fresh? Instead, it has the firm, undesirable texture that comes about when the bread is going stale. Chemically, what happens during the staling process? Can it be reversed (at least temporarily)? Do some background research to answer these questions and then apply those answers to one (or more) of the following experiments to find the optimal state to keep your bread fresh. Experiment 1: What Temperature Keeps… Read more
FoodSci_p019
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
Here's a riddle for you: What would a latté be without a froth of bubbly milk on top? Answer: Black coffee! And how about a pumpkin pie without the whipped cream? Answer: Sad. Delicious, edible foams are everywhere, from sodas, meringues, and soufflés to mousses and whipped creams. They provide a delicious, spongy contrast to the foods they accompany, and their airiness releases aromas that enhance the eating experience. So, what makes a good foam? One with high volume and lots of… Read more
FoodSci_p057
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability You will need to buy items from a science supply store. See the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Be sure to wear safety goggles. Wash your hands after handling raw eggs. You should not eat any of the foams you make in your experiment.
Science Fair Project Idea
A delicious and quick lunch is a cup of tomato soup and a grilled cheese sandwich. Biting into the toasty, butter-soaked bread and gooey cheese is very comforting. But what makes the cheese melt so nicely? Do all cheeses melt this way? In this cooking and food science fair project, you will experiment with making and determining the best recipe for processed cheese. Read more
FoodSci_p054
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites You will need access to a refrigerator, a stovetop, and an oven.
Material Availability Specialty items are required. See the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Minor injury is possible. Adult supervision is required. Since the sodium phosphate dibasic is not a food-grade substance, do not eat any of the resulting processed cheeses.
Science Fair Project Idea
Have any of your friends or family members ever had an allergic reaction to eggs? In this science project idea, you'll investigate how to modify recipes so that even egg-allergic friends and family members can enjoy them. Read more
FoodSci_p002
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Adult supervision required when using the oven, stove, blender, or chopping ingredients.
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever dyed eggs? Turning eggshells from white into different, dazzling colors can be a lot of fun! To do this, most people buy dye tablets to make different colors in a liquid bath. They then dip the egg into the liquid and wait till it turns the desired color. You can dye eggs in many other ways, and one neat method uses silk ties. Sounds strange to use clothing to dye eggs, right? But it actually works really well! In this science project, you will dye eggs with old or used… Read more
Chem_p103
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety Adult supervision is recommended when using scissors and required for using the stove. A well-ventilated stove area, or dust masks, are needed to avoid breathing in vinegar and dye fumes. Do not eat the eggs after dyeing them.
Science Fair Project Idea
If you like to bake, this could be a good science project for you! Have you ever wondered about the purpose of each of the ingredients in your favorite recipes? For example, why is baking powder used in some muffin recipes? How does the baking powder affect how the muffins look, feel, and taste? In this food science project you will use a scientific method to find out! Read more
FoodSci_p007
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites Previous experience with baking is helpful, but not absolutely necessary.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Minor injury possible: hot oven. Be sure to have an adult help when using the oven.
Science Fair Project Idea
Here's a chemistry project for a beginning scientist. You'll need two 100 ml graduated cylinders, rubbing alcohol, water and liquid food dye. (You can make your own measuring cylinder from a recycled jar: tape a vertical label on the jar and carefully add water 1/4-cup at a time; mark the level on the label with each addition.) Measure 50 ml of water. Add a drop or two of food coloring and mix. In the second cylinder, measure 50 ml of rubbing alcohol. Carefully pour this… Read more
Chem_p036
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Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Science Fair Project Idea
The clothes you wear are made of fibers that come from many different sources. Some fabrics are made from natural fibers, and some from manufactured or totally synthetic fibers. In this science fair project, you will explore how different fiber types react with dye. Are you dye-ing to find out which works best? Read more
Chem_p019
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Specialty items: fiber-reactive dye and soda ash are necessary. See the Materials and Equipment list for more details.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Safety goggles and rubber gloves are needed for some steps. See the Procedure for more details. Additionally, items that come in contact with soda ash should not be used with food afterward. See the Materials for more details.
Science Fair Project Idea
Do you ever wonder how markers are made? Where do all of those colors come from? Many of the colorful dyes we use come from plants. Could you create vibrant colored natural dyes? Could you turn these dyes into art supplies? You can! In this science project, become a scientist and engineer and make your own marker using homemade plant dye! Read more
Chem_p014
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Filter paper can be purchased from the [# Link Name="PlantBio_p035.1" Value="HtmlAnchor" #]. Time required includes time for shipping the filter paper.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Adult supervision required.
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