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Others Like “Processed Cheese, Please! Get Your Grilled Cheese Oooey Gooey Instead of Oily and Gloppy”

Project Idea
thumbnail Oooey gooey cheese...yum! Who doesn't like a slice of warm pizza straight from the oven? There's nothing quite like a slice of pizza and a glass of milk, so what makes pizza so great? The cheese! But did you know that making cheese is all about science and chemistry? In this science fair project, you will learn more about the science of cheese making and what kind of milk works best. Try this science fair project and you'll learn about science and get something yummy to eat afterward! Read more
FoodSci_p041
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites Access to a stove and a microwave.
Material Availability Specialty items are required: rennet tablets, citric acid, and a dairy thermometer. See the Materials and Equipment list for more information.
Cost Average ($50 - $100)
Safety Always exercise caution when working with a stove and hot liquids. Adult supervision is required.
Project Idea
thumbnail Apple pie is one of America's traditional desserts. It can be enjoyed on its own or with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. The cool sweetness of the ice cream combines with the warm apples and flaky pastry to create a taste sensation. However, if the pastry that surrounds the apples is heavy or chewy then that can really affect how much you enjoy this treat. But how do you make a pastry that is light and flaky? In this cooking and food science fair project, you will find out by experimenting with… Read more
FoodSci_p055
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites You must have access to a refrigerator, an oven, and a stovetop.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Minor injury is possible.
Project Idea
Sauerkraut, pickled fish, pickled vegetables, kimchi, corned beef, processed cheeses, smoked lunch meats. Do you like these high-salt foods? What about your grandparents, do they? Do your grandparents seem to like most foods to be a bit saltier than you do? Try this science fair project if you want to find out more about the incredible, edible rock known as salt, and why people vary in how much of it they like to eat. Read more
HumBio_p026
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Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues. Adult supervision is recommended to help with the pouring of large pots of water.
Project Idea
thumbnail If you like to bake, this could be a good science project for you! Have you ever wondered about the purpose of each of the ingredients in your favorite recipes? For example, why is baking powder used in some muffin recipes? How does the baking powder affect how the muffins look, feel, and taste? In this food science project you will use a scientific method to find out! Read more
FoodSci_p007
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites Previous experience with baking is helpful, but not absolutely necessary.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Minor injury possible: hot oven. Be sure to have an adult help when using the oven.
Project Idea
thumbnail OK, spill the beans, what's your favorite bean-rich food? Burritos? Chili? Or maybe you prefer the spicy Indian stew of lentils, known as dal? But what about fried tofu? Soymilk? Or peanut butter and jelly sandwiches? Did you know those foods come from beans as well? Beans are important to the diets of many people, and in this cooking and food science fair project, you'll learn how the liquid that beans are cooked in affects how quickly or slowly they soften. Read more
FoodSci_p026
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Adult supervision is required when using the stove.
Project Idea
thumbnail In this project, you'll learn how to isolate DNA from onion cells, separating it from other cellular components in a manner that still preserves its structure and sequence. In the end, you'll have enough DNA to see with the unaided eye, and you'll be able to spool it to demonstrate its strand-like structure. Read more
BioChem_p001
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Project Idea
In this cooking and food science fair project, you will explore the role of proteins as emulsifying agents. Emulsifying agents are substances that are soluble in both fat and water and enable fat to be uniformly dispersed in water as an emulsion. Foods that consist of such emulsions include butter, margarine, salad dressings, mayonnaise, and ice cream. Emulsifying agents are also used in baking to aid the smooth incorporation of fat into the dough and to keep the baked goods tender. Natural… Read more
FoodSci_p021
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
thumbnail Here's a riddle for you: What would a latté be without a froth of bubbly milk on top? Answer: Black coffee! And how about a pumpkin pie without the whipped cream? Answer: Sad. Delicious, edible foams are everywhere, from sodas, meringues, and soufflés to mousses and whipped creams. They provide a delicious, spongy contrast to the foods they accompany, and their airiness releases aromas that enhance the eating experience. So, what makes a good foam? One with high volume and lots of… Read more
FoodSci_p057
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability You will need to buy items from a science supply store. See the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Be sure to wear safety goggles. Wash your hands after handling raw eggs. You should not eat any of the foams you make in your experiment.
Project Idea
thumbnail "Plastic made from milk" —that certainly sounds like something made-up. If you agree, you may be surprised to learn that in the early 20th century, milk was used to make many different plastic ornaments —including jewelry for Queen Mary of England! In this chemistry science project, you can figure out the best recipe to make your own milk plastic (usually called casein plastic) and use it to make beads, ornaments, or other items. Read more
Chem_p101
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety This science project uses hot liquids. Adult supervision and/or help is needed.
Project Idea
thumbnail What do you look forward to when the holidays arrive? Spending time with friends and family? Having lots of free time? How about the delicious food that comes out of the kitchen? You bet! What kinds of food do you have on your table during those special times of the year? For many people, mashed potatoes and gravy are usually on the holiday menu. Whether light and fluffy or smooth and silk-like, mashed potatoes are very satisfying. What is not satisfying is when the cook makes a mistake in… Read more
FoodSci_p069
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites You must have access to a stove top, a potato ricer, a food processor, a microwave, and a kitchen scale.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety This science project requires the use of a stove top, a knife, a food processor, and peelers. Minor injury is possible. You will be steaming the potatoes. Avoid placing any part of yourself in the path of the steam, as steam can cause painful burns. Adult supervision is required.
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