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Project Idea
Learning to play an instrument can be a lot of fun, especially when you can pretend to be a rock star as you learn! In this science fair project, you will study how your score in a music video game changes as you play and practice. You'll need a video game where you use a controller shaped like a musical instrument. Two examples include Guitar Hero and Rock Band, but there may be more! In these games, playing requires nothing more than a sense of the music's beat, and ridiculously fast fingers,… Read more
Games_p020
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability You'll need access to a video game system on which you can play a music based video game.
Cost Average ($50 - $100)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
Have you ever watched an inexperienced video game player pick up a controller and start playing a game? Often the player bumbles around trying to figure out which button makes the onscreen character jump, run, turn left, or perform other actions. Some games are different though, they have control schemes that are more real-world based. Examples include Nintendo® WiiTM Tennis where you swing the Wii remote like a tennis racket and Activision's Guitar Hero® where you can play with a… Read more
Games_p022
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability You should have access to a video game console or computer, and a video or computer game that requires both a regular control and a peripheral. See the Introduction for details.
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
Are there some songs that always make you feel sad when you hear them? How about "Scarborough Fair," George Gershwin's "Summertime," or the Beatles' "Eleanor Rigby"? All of these songs are in a minor key. Minor keys have more intervals, or halftones, than major keys do. Some musicologists (people who study music) maintain that minor-key songs are more likely to be perceived as sad, while major-key songs are more likely to be interpreted as happy. You can research the competing explanations… Read more
Music_p018
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites You should know how to convert a simple song from a major key to a minor key, or know an experienced musician or music teacher who can help you with the conversions.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
thumbnail Here's an interesting way to get some music into your science fair project. What predictions would you make about people with relative pitch? Read more
Music_p015
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites Access to a piano
Material Availability Specialty items
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
You probably know that where you live on Earth affects your weather. If you live in a far northern or far southern latitude, you experience colder temperatures than people who live near the equator at latitudes close to zero. Your latitude on Earth affects many aspects of your culture, like how you dress, what kind of house you live in, what foods you eat, and even how your day is structured: what time you go to school, to dinner, and to sleep. Some cities at latitudes closer to the equator,… Read more
Music_p020
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites You must have Internet access with a personal computer.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
Walk into a fitness club and what kind of music do you hear? Slow, sparkling, relaxing music? Or driving, "up-tempo" songs that are designed to encourage you to move? Fitness clubs and other businesses, like restaurants and grocery stores, use background music to set the mood and to determine how fast they want their customers to move. The tempo of the background music is a key component to the environment that businesses want to create. Tempo is an important number or word inscribed by a… Read more
Music_p033
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
There are many different types, also called genres, of computer and video games, including racing, fighting, sports, adventure, and puzzle games. Do some genres of games appeal more to males and other genres more to females? Survey your classmates and find out in this science fair project! Read more
Games_p019
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
Have you ever wondered about the various types of music in a video game you've played? You may not have paid much attention to the music, but its job was to enhance your gaming experience. In fact, the wrong kind of music can detract from the atmosphere of the game. Can you imagine the music in Mario KartTM playing in Street Fighter®? In a game, music can indicate many different things, such as a special or new event, shift of mood, or the arrival of a character. This kind of music is… Read more
Games_p030
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- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
thumbnail What is the highest note you can sing? How about the lowest? Do you think males and females can reach the same notes? How about children and adults? Find out the answers to all these questions in this "note"-worthy science fair project! Read more
Music_p027
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites To do this science fair project, you'll either need to know which key is middle C on your piano or keyboard or have a friend or family member show you. See the Experimental Procedure for more details.
Material Availability This science fair project requires access to a piano or keyboard.
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
thumbnail Did you know that your guitar has a secret? Yes, that's right—hidden along each string are special places where you can play harmonics and make your guitar sound like a bell! In this music science fair project, you'll find out where the main harmonics are located on a guitar, and then see how those locations are related to the length of the strings. So get out your guitar—it's time to ring in a science fair project! Read more
Music_p030
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Access to an acoustic guitar is required.
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
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