Home Project Ideas Project Guide Ask An Expert Blog Careers Teachers Parents Students

Others Like “How Does a Wind Meter Work?”

Project Idea
thumbnail The poet Carl Sandburg wrote, "The fog comes on little cat feet…" In this weather science fair project, you'll discover why this beautiful, quiet creeper appears on some days, and not on others. If you are fascinated by fog and weather conditions, this science fair project is for you! Read more
Weather_p028
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Very Long (1+ months)
Prerequisites Each morning around sunrise, you will need to make visual observations of a field, park, or other area with considerable plant matter within 10 minutes of your home.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
thumbnail Have you heard the term windchill used before? Maybe on the TV weather forecast? The windchill factor describes what happens to an object (like your body) when it is cold and windy outside. As wind increases, heat is carried away from the body at a faster rate, driving down both skin temperature (which can cause frostbite) and eventually the internal body temperature (which, in extreme cases, can lead to death). In this science fair project, you will use a device to measure wind speed (an… Read more
Weather_p029
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability The anemometer and infrared thermometer can be purchased online.
Cost High ($100 - $150)
Safety Adult supervision is recommended.
Project Idea
thumbnail Did you know that your body has a built-in cooler? And it might not be what you think! Sweat is produced when you are hot, but its purpose is actually to cool your body as the water in it evaporates from your skin. In this science fair project, you'll use the energy produced when water evaporates to cool down chocolate-covered candy so it doesn't melt. Read more
Chem_p076
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
A strobe light can illuminate an entire room in just tens of microseconds. Inexpensive strobe lights can flash up to 10 or 20 times per second. This project shows you how to use stroboscopic photography to analyze motion. Read more
Photo_p003
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites This project requires camera with adjustable shutter speeds and lens apertures, a tripod and cable release.
Material Availability Specialty items
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety No hazards
Project Idea
thumbnail In this project, you will make 2-dimensional templates, called nets, that fold up into 3-dimensional (3-D) shapes. By making shapes of different sizes, you will be able to see how 3-D shapes change with size. Which property (or aspect) will change the most: the length of an edge, the surface area, or the volume? Read more
Math_p045
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
thumbnail Race car drivers need every advantage they can get to give them the competitive edge in a race. In addition to human factors, like driving skill and reaction time, their cars must overcome physical forces, like air resistance, to maintain their high speeds. While this science project will not have you driving around a race track at 200 miles per hour, you will get to test how increased air resistance affects a real car's fuel economy. You will do this by measuring and comparing the gas mileage… Read more
Aero_p028
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Long (2-4 weeks)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability This science project requires an adult volunteer with a driver's license and who is allowed to drive a car. A car that already has a detachable roof rack is recommended, but a detachable roof rack may be purchased to do this science project. See the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Average ($50 - $100)
Safety Never try to record data or distract the driver while you are in a moving vehicle. Always collect your data when the car is parked at home.
Project Idea
thumbnail Alternative energy sources are a big deal these days. One such source is the wind. Find out how a wind turbine can use the power of the wind to generate energy in this science fair engineering project. You'll design various blades to find out which produces the most energy, and put the wind to work for you! Read more
Aero_p040
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety Use caution when using the drill. Always wear safety goggles when working with power tools. Adult supervision is recommended.
Project Idea
thumbnail Have you ever wondered what a wildlife biologist does? Ronnie and Denise from DragonflyTV found out firsthand when they worked with a local wildlife biologist to take a survey of the fish populations in their local lake. They wanted to determine what the biodiversity (number of different species in a habitat) was like so that they could find out how healthy the lake habitat was. In this science fair project you can take on the role of a wildlife biologist by examining the biodiversity of… Read more
EnvSci_p045
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety Adult supervision needed to make bug vacuum.
Project Idea
thumbnail Here's a good way to get yourself on TV! This science fair project will help you learn how to predict the weather. So who knows, maybe you'll be more accurate than your local meteorologist. You just might get hired! (Someday.) Read more
Weather_p001
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety No issues
Project Idea
thumbnail When your parents were kids, they probably wore polyester. Static cling was a major household issue! Now everybody wears cotton, which does not get static cling nearly as much. Why are some materials more susceptible to static cling than others? Investigate how well different materials produce static electricity by making a homemade electroscope and testing it out in this science project. Read more
Elec_p023
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety When working with electricity, take precautions and beware of electric shock.
1 2 >
Support for Science Buddies provided by:
Search Refinements
Areas of Science
Behavioral & Social Science
Earth & Environmental Science
Engineering
Life Science
Math & Computer Science
Physical Science
Difficulty
 
Cost
Time
Material Availability