A man draws blueprints next to a laptop

An architect could...


Create innovative designs for college dorms, like this one built from used shipping containers. A small house built from a shipping container Shape the skyline of a city by creating plans for an iconic building. Aerial photo of an egg-shaped skyscraper
Design and draw up blueprints for a family's dream house. Digital blueprints for a house Collaborate with engineers to create modern skyscrapers, like London's Gherkin. Aerial photo of a communications tower that resembles the Eiffel Tower
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Key Facts & Information

Overview The essayist and poet Ralph Waldo Emerson called Greek architecture the "flowering of geometry." Architects blend art and science, designing structures for people, such as houses, apartments, schools, stores, malls, offices, places of worship, museums, sports stadiums, music theaters, and convention centers. Their designs must take into account not only the structure's appearance, but its safety, function, environmental impact, and cost. Architects often participate in all phases of design, from the initial consultation with the clients where the structure is envisioned, to its completion. Architects can enrich people lives by creating structures that are as beautiful to look at as they are functional to live, work, or shop in.
Key Requirements Creativity, excellent spatial skills, the ability to work independently and in groups, and outstanding communication skills
Minimum Degree Bachelor's degree
Subjects to Study in High School Physics, chemistry, geometry, algebra II, pre-calculus, calculus, English; if available, art, applied technology (CAD).
Median Salary
Architect
  $76,930
U.S. Mean Annual Wage
  $49,630
Min Wage
  $15,080
$0
$10,000
$20,000
$30,000
$40,000
$50,000
$60,000
$70,000
$80,000
$90,000
Projected Job Growth (2014-2024) More Slowly than Average (3% to 6%)
Interview
  • Read this article to learn accomplished architect Gyo Obata's advice for the next generation of architectural students.
  • Read about Teresa Rosano, architect— her exposure to art and construction, talent for architecture, the actual work, and details of an inspriring career and business.
  • Read this interview with Wen Quek to find out why, for her, architecture is the perfect blend of art and science.
Related Occupations
Source: O*Net

Training, Other Qualifications

There are three main steps in becoming an architect: completing a professional degree in architecture; gaining work experience through an internship; and attaining licensure by passing the Architect Registration Exam.

Education and Training

In most states, architects must hold a professional degree in architecture from one of the 117 schools of architecture that have degree programs accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). However, state architectural registration boards set their own standards, so graduation from a non-accredited program might meet the educational requirement for licensing in a few states.

Most architects earn their professional degree through a 5-year Bachelor of Architecture degree program, which is intended for students with no previous architectural training. Others earn a master's degree after completing a bachelor's degree in another field or after completing a pre-professional architecture program. A master's degree in architecture can take 1 to 5 years to complete, depending on the extent of previous training in architecture.

The choice of degree depends on preference and educational background. Prospective architecture students should consider the options before committing to a program. For example, although the 5-year bachelor of architecture offers the most direct route to the professional degree, courses are specialized, and if the student does not complete the program, transferring to a program in another discipline might be difficult. A typical program includes courses in architectural history and theory, building design with an emphasis on CADD, structures, technology, construction methods, professional practice, math, physical sciences, and liberal arts. Central to most architectural programs is the design studio, where students apply the skills and concepts learned in the classroom and create drawings and three-dimensional models of their designs.

Many schools of architecture also offer post-professional degrees for those who already have a bachelor's or master's degree in architecture or other areas. Although graduate education beyond the professional degree is not required for practicing architects, it might be useful for research, teaching, and certain specialties.

All state architectural registration boards require architecture graduates to complete a training period—usually at least 3 years—before they can sit for the licensing exam. Every state follows the training standards established by the Intern Development Program, a program of the American Institute of Architects and the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB). These standards stipulate broad training under the supervision of a licensed architect. Most new graduates complete their training period by working as interns at architectural firms. Some states allow a portion of the training to occur in the offices of related professionals, such as engineers or general contractors. Architecture students who complete internships while still in school can count some of that time toward the 3-year training period.

Interns in architectural firms might assist in the design of one part of a project, help prepare architectural documents or drawings, build models, or prepare construction drawings on CADD. Interns also may research building codes and materials or write specifications for building materials, installation criteria, the quality of finishes, and other related details.

Other Qualifications

Architects must be able to communicate their ideas visually to their clients. Artistic and drawing ability is helpful, but not essential, to such communication. More important are a visual orientation and the ability to understand spatial relationships. Other important qualities for anyone interested in becoming an architect are creativity and the ability to work independently and as part of a team. Computer skills are also required for writing specifications, for 2-dimensional and 3- dimensional drafting using CADD programs, and for financial management.

Nature of the Work

People need places in which to live, work, play, learn, worship, meet, govern, shop, and eat. Architects are responsible for designing these places, whether they are private or public; indoors or out; rooms, buildings, or complexes. Architects are licensed professionals trained in the art and science of building design who develop the concepts for structures and turn those concepts into images and plans.

Architects create the overall look of buildings and other structures, but the design of a building involves far more than its appearance. Buildings must also be functional, safe, and economical, and must suit the needs of the people who use them. Architects consider all of these factors when they design buildings and other structures.

Architects might be involved in all phases of a construction project, from the initial discussion with the client, through the final delivery of the completed structure. Their duties require specific skills—designing, engineering, managing, supervising, and communicating with clients and builders. Architects spend a great deal of time explaining their ideas to clients, construction contractors, and others. Successful architects must be able to communicate their unique visions persuasively.

The architects and clients discuss the objectives, requirements, and budget of a project. In some cases, architects provide various pre-design services: conducting feasibility and environmental impact studies, selecting a site, preparing cost analysis and land-use studies, or specifying the requirements the design must meet. For example, they might determine space requirements by researching the numbers and types of potential users of a building. The architect then prepares drawings and a report that presents ideas for the client to review.

After discussing and agreeing on the initial proposal, architects develop final construction plans that show the building's appearance, and details for its construction. Accompanying these plans are drawings of the structural system; air-conditioning, heating, and ventilating systems; electrical systems; communications systems; plumbing; and, possibly, site and landscape plans. The plans also specify the building materials and, in some cases, the interior furnishings. In developing designs, architects follow building codes, zoning laws, fire regulations, and other ordinances, such as those requiring easy access by people who are disabled. Computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) and building information modeling (BIM) technology has replaced traditional paper and pencil as the most common method for creating design and construction drawings. Continual revision of plans on the basis of client needs and budget constraints is often necessary.

Architects might also assist clients in obtaining construction bids, selecting contractors, and negotiating construction contracts. As construction proceeds, they might visit building sites to make sure that contractors follow the design, adhere to the schedule, use the specified materials, and meet work quality standards. The job is not complete until all construction is finished, required tests are conducted, and construction costs are paid. Sometimes, architects also provide post-construction services, such as facilities management. They advise on energy-efficiency measures, evaluate how well the building design adapts to the needs of occupants, and make necessary improvements.

Often working with engineers, urban planners, interior designers, landscape architects, and other professionals, architects in fact spend a great deal of their time coordinating information from, and the work of, other professionals engaged in the same project.

Architects sometimes specialize in one phase of work. Some specialize in the design of one type of building; such as hospitals, schools, or housing. Others focus on planning and pre-design services or construction management and do minimal design work.

Work Environment

Usually working in a comfortable environment, architects spend most of their time in offices consulting with clients, developing reports and drawings, and working with other architects and engineers. However, they often visit construction sites to review the progress of projects. In 2008, approximately 1 in 5 architects worked more than 50 hours per week, as long hours and work during nights and weekends is often necessary to meet deadlines.

On the Job

  • Consult with client to determine functional and spatial requirements of structure.
  • Prepare scale drawings.
  • Plan layout of project.
  • Prepare information regarding design, structure specifications, materials, color, equipment, estimated costs, or construction time.
  • Integrate engineering element into unified design.
  • Prepare contract documents for building contractors.
  • Direct activities of workers engaged in preparing drawings and specification documents.
  • Conduct periodic on-site observation of work during construction to monitor compliance with plans.
  • Seek new work opportunities through marketing, writing proposals, or giving presentations.
  • Administer construction contracts.
  • Represent client in obtaining bids and awarding construction contracts.
  • Prepare operating and maintenance manuals, studies, and reports.

Source: BLS

Companies That Hire Architects

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