Louise
Former Expert
Posts: 921
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 2:17 pm

Postby Louise » Mon Aug 13, 2007 8:09 am

Blossom wrote:Thank you. As for the display board, what is the difference between the text that goes on there and the one in the research paper?


Why don't you look here:

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/mentoring/project_display_board_big_boards.shtml

and at the related links in the top corner.

Generally, the text on your board should be a summary version of what is in your paper. Don't put so much text it is un-readable. Also, note carefully any specific rules about the board that your fair may have.


Louise

Blossom
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2007 1:52 pm

Postby Blossom » Fri Aug 17, 2007 7:15 am

Thanks. Does it matter whether your project is contributing towards more "abstract" science (e.g. researching a biological topic) or very "practical" science (e.g. improving something)?

Blossom
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2007 1:52 pm

Postby Blossom » Fri Aug 17, 2007 6:00 pm

Also, when you're writing up the project, is it necessary to do footnotes on all the facts you cite? Or is a bibliography at the end sufficient?

tdaly
Former Expert
Posts: 1415
Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2003 11:27 pm
Occupation: Planetary Scientist

Postby tdaly » Fri Aug 17, 2007 7:38 pm

Blossom,

Sorry for the delayed response. To answer your questions:

YES, you need to cite your sources in text. THe exact protocol varies from field to field, but it might be something like "...provides convincing evidence that the Earth is round. [2]" In your bibliography, you have a reference numbered 2, so the reader knows where to look for more information. Take a look at journal articles in your discipline to get aquainted with the citation format for your field of science.

In a sense, yes, it does matter whether your project is, as you term it, "abstract" or "practical." The fact of the matter is that every bit of science is practical. The judges are interested in how thourough you are in doing science and the applications for your work. It is imperative that you understand why what you are doing is important. It doesn't need to be life-changing or revolutionize the world of science, but you need to understand your work's importance. For instance, I study the chemical changes happening when asteriods and planets collide. Is that going to cure cancer or stop global warming? No. But in the field of planetary science, understanding these chemical processes is crucial to understanding how the solar system has evolved. Become familiar with the applications and implications of your work.

The text on the display board should be highlights of your project, a summary of your work. The research paper is much more detailed and arguably more technical. We can clarify this question in further detail later, but let's not worry about the display until we have the actual project done. First things first :)
All the best,
Terik

Blossom
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2007 1:52 pm

Postby Blossom » Sun Aug 26, 2007 1:21 pm

Thanks. About the research plan, what if I'm not 100% sure what my exact procedure is, and I'm developing it as I'm "experimenting on experimenting" a little bit? Do I really need to know exactly what I'm going to do right away and write up the final draft of the research plan?

tdaly
Former Expert
Posts: 1415
Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2003 11:27 pm
Occupation: Planetary Scientist

Postby tdaly » Mon Aug 27, 2007 7:55 am

Blossom,

For your research plan (I'm assuming you are talking about form 1A and its attachedments) you need to submit an exact procedure. Now don't pull your hair out just yet - your procedure should only be as complete as you have it right now. It is far more important to get approval before starting work than it is to have your procedure nailed down 100%. The fact is that procedures don't always work: that's what makes science interesting. If something doesn't work, you go back and try something different.

The most important thing is this: WHENEVER you decide to make ANY changes to your procedures (amounts of reagents, number of samples, ANYTHING!!!) you MUST notify your SRC. I reccomend sending an e-mail to your SRC director with any changes you make.

Is this clear, or have I confused you? If you have any questions, please feel free to ask. You may also wish to contact your Intel-ISEF affiliated fair's SRC director for more specific directions.
All the best,
Terik


Return to “Intel ISEF Preparation”