smlampphill
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2014 5:55 am
Occupation: Parent

Info on candy confusion project

Postby smlampphill » Tue Oct 28, 2014 6:42 am

Is candy confusion a true scientific experiment / method as opposed to a population study ? If so what would be the manipulative variables? Info as stated requested by moderator for school science fair. Thank you

scibuddyAK
Former Expert
Posts: 118
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2013 5:19 pm
Occupation: Mentor/Moderator

Re: Info on candy confusion project

Postby scibuddyAK » Fri Oct 31, 2014 7:10 pm

Hi smlampphill,

Thanks for the question! I assume you're talking about this project: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... ml#summary (Candy Confusion on Science Buddies).

To help answer some of your questions, an experimental study involves specifically modifying/testing one parameter and looking for desired results. A correlational study, on the other hand, seeks to find relationships between two variables (usually in a population) without specifically exposing one group of people to a modified parameter. While Candy Confusion may not be a "true scientific experiment" in that sense, it is still a valuable project to do to understand and apply the scientific method.

A manipulative variable is what you change to observe its effects on something else, the dependent variable. The manipulative variable could be considered as age of the child in this study (as you're looking to see what effect age has on distinguishing candy from medicine), but to double-check, I'd point you to the Science Buddies resource pages. There is information on the scientific method and these terms that may help you greatly!

Thanks,
scibuddyAK

connief
Former Expert
Posts: 302
Joined: Thu Apr 04, 2013 12:27 pm
Occupation: Graduate Student

Re: Info on candy confusion project

Postby connief » Sat Nov 01, 2014 1:56 pm

Hi there,

The previous expert already gave you a great answer, and in addition to his/her comment, I would like to add that Science Buddies has a page that explains pretty well how to define independent and dependent variables in your experiments, and thought that this would serve as a really great resource as you plan this as well as future experiments!

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... evariables

Let us know if you have anymore questions as you continue on with this project!

Connie


Return to “Grades K-5: Life, Earth, and Social Sciences”