botanykid
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2007 11:42 am

ph balance and it's affect on bean plant growth

Postby botanykid » Fri Nov 16, 2007 11:47 am

my research is telling me that a ph range of 6.0 - 7.5 is accurate for bean plants, but I would like to know the reason why. help?
nocain

Willz
Former Expert
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 10:28 pm

Postby Willz » Fri Nov 16, 2007 7:40 pm

Hello!

Interesting experiment that you are researching! As for your question, know that pH is short for percent hydronium ions, and the scale ranges from 0-14: 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is alkaline.

First of all, do you mean the pH of the soil or of the water? Most plants require soil and water pH of about 7 (neutral). However, most minerals and nutrients are more soluble in acid soils than in slightly alkaline soils. Basically, different plants require different soil pH levels because the soil pH directly affects the plant's ability to take up certain nutrients. In order for a plant to take in the necessary nutrients, these nutrients must be dissolved, and therefore, the soil must have the right pH so that these nutrients are soluble.

A pH range of 6.0-7.5 is around neutral, and at this pH, most nutrients that plants need are readily available. If the pH is above 6 or 7.5, then certain nutrients are less available:
Below a pH of 6.0 (acid): Some nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium are less available.
Above a pH of 7.5 (very alkaline): Iron, manganese, and phosphorus are less available.

If you haven't already, take a look at this: http://www.infoplease.com/cig/science-f ... lants.html
A lot of the information I have provided is more thoroughly explained on this great website that I happened to stumble upon: http://www.plantea.com/pH.htm

This may be a lot of information, but make sure you digest all of it as best as you can.
Hope this helps!

botanykid
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2007 11:42 am

Postby botanykid » Sat Nov 17, 2007 7:57 am

Willz wrote:Hello!

Interesting experiment that you are researching! As for your question, know that pH is short for percent hydronium ions, and the scale ranges from 0-14: 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is alkaline.

First of all, do you mean the pH of the soil or of the water? Most plants require soil and water pH of about 7 (neutral). However, most minerals and nutrients are more soluble in acid soils than in slightly alkaline soils. Basically, different plants require different soil pH levels because the soil pH directly affects the plant's ability to take up certain nutrients. In order for a plant to take in the necessary nutrients, these nutrients must be dissolved, and therefore, the soil must have the right pH so that these nutrients are soluble.

A pH range of 6.0-7.5 is around neutral, and at this pH, most nutrients that plants need are readily available. If the pH is above 6 or 7.5, then certain nutrients are less available:
Below a pH of 6.0 (acid): Some nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium are less available.
Above a pH of 7.5 (very alkaline): Iron, manganese, and phosphorus are less available.

If you haven't already, take a look at this: http://www.infoplease.com/cig/science-f ... lants.html
A lot of the information I have provided is more thoroughly explained on this great website that I happened to stumble upon: http://www.plantea.com/pH.htm

This may be a lot of information, but make sure you digest all of it as best as you can.
Hope this helps!


Thank you so much. The plantea.com site is very easy to understand. I am testing the different balances of ph in water that I use to water my test plants.
nocain


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