fruitypebbles18
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Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby fruitypebbles18 » Thu Nov 16, 2017 9:36 pm

PLEASE SOMEONE I REALLY NEED HELP ON HOW TO COLLECT DATA FOR THIS AND WHAT MY VARIABLES WOULD BE BECAUSE NOTHING REALLY CHANGES EXCEPT MY END RESULT. I ALREADY TESTED IT AND DARK GREEN VEGGIES HAVE MORE VITAMIN C MY PROCEDURE CAN BE FOUND HERE: https://www.education.com/science-fair/ ... vitamin-c/

I REALLY NEED THIS BECAUSE I AM STUCK AND DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO. ALSO I NEED TO KNOW DOES THE ONE THAT TURNS DARKER MEAN IT HAS MORE VITAMIN C OR THE ONE THAT TURNS LIGHTER AND WHY. BECAUSE THE WEBSITE WASN'T CLEAR AND ALSO TO ONCE AGAIN CLARIFY, I NEED TO KNOW HOW TO RECORD THE DATA FOR IT BECAUSE I DON'T HAVE ANY NUMBERS TO RECORD SO HOW WOULD I MAKE A CHART OR ANYTHING? PLEASE REPLY AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. THANK YOU SO MUCH :cry:

LeungWilley
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby LeungWilley » Thu Nov 16, 2017 10:09 pm

Hi fruitypebbles18,
Sorry to hear that you are having trouble with your experiment.

For your variable, please re-examine your hypothesis statement. (Stated another way, your hypothesis is A vs B, so the difference between A and B is your variable)

For recording data, you might want to consider using a color scale similar to that of a pH strip. (For example, let's say really dark green is a 10 and light green is 1.) You can then use the same idea to record the data on the iodine solution (purple / darker color, etc...) results.

Please let us know if there's anything else we can do to help.
Good Luck!
Willey

fruitypebbles18
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby fruitypebbles18 » Thu Nov 16, 2017 10:15 pm

LeungWilley wrote:Hi fruitypebbles18,
Sorry to hear that you are having trouble with your experiment.

For your variable, please re-examine your hypothesis statement. (Stated another way, your hypothesis is A vs B, so the difference between A and B is your variable)

For recording data, you might want to consider using a color scale similar to that of a pH strip. (For example, let's say really dark green is a 10 and light green is 1.) You can then use the same idea to record the data on the iodine solution (purple / darker color, etc...) results.

Please let us know if there's anything else we can do to help.
Good Luck!
Willey



hi, i didn't understand what you meant when you said use a ph strip if i already preformed the experiment. But i have this science packet that i have to fill out for data but there is no numerical data just the final answer.pls clarify that and what do you mean "so the difference between A and B is your variable. Please clarify further. thank you

LeungWilley
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby LeungWilley » Thu Nov 16, 2017 10:27 pm

Hi,
The pH strip was an example of a color scale (https://www.derustit.com/products/ph_test_kits.php) and you can apply this concept to the result of your experiment. (Again, for example, Really Dark green can be given a value of 10, Light green a value of 1).

For the variable, you are comparing "Dark Green, Leafy Veggies" vs. "Lighter-Colored Veggies" from your topic statement so the difference is how "green" is the veggies.

Good Luck!
Willey

fruitypebbles18
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby fruitypebbles18 » Thu Nov 16, 2017 10:35 pm

LeungWilley wrote:Hi,
The pH strip was an example of a color scale (https://www.derustit.com/products/ph_test_kits.php) and you can apply this concept to the result of your experiment. (Again, for example, Really Dark green can be given a value of 10, Light green a value of 1).

For the variable, you are comparing "Dark Green, Leafy Veggies" vs. "Lighter-Colored Veggies" from your topic statement so the difference is how "green" is the veggies.

Good Luck!
Willey



ok thank you so how would i be able to make that on paper? draw somewhat of a PH scale? please explain thoroughly. thanks

LeungWilley
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby LeungWilley » Thu Nov 16, 2017 10:49 pm

Hi,
This is the fun part - it's entirely up to you how you want to make up this scale. :)

For example, if you have one of the standard Crayola Colored pencil set, you can start with the light green on the left hand side and gets darker as it moves to the right. As you build this scale to the right, you can assign different number (1-10) that represents the different shades of green. Ideally, this scale should match the color of the vegetable you tested. (You would want the vegetable that was most "dark green" as the 10 and the lightest is a 1 to give you the best "resolution")

Good Luck!
Willey

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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby fruitypebbles18 » Thu Nov 16, 2017 10:56 pm

LeungWilley wrote:Hi,
This is the fun part - it's entirely up to you how you want to make up this scale. :)

For example, if you have one of the standard Crayola Colored pencil set, you can start with the light green on the left hand side and gets darker as it moves to the right. As you build this scale to the right, you can assign different number (1-10) that represents the different shades of green. Ideally, this scale should match the color of the vegetable you tested. (You would want the vegetable that was most "dark green" as the 10 and the lightest is a 1 to give you the best "resolution")

Good Luck!
Willey


omg thank you so so so so much. i will definitely try that and FOR SURE KEEP YOU UPDATED. but also, would that technically count as data? like, if i put that on my board, how would i explain it in words, like on paper, because my packet requires me to write data. THANK YOU THANK YOU

LeungWilley
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby LeungWilley » Fri Nov 17, 2017 4:58 am

Hi,
Absolutely, this is data but you do have to present it in a way that shows the result of your experiment.

Here's one example of doing so:

1. Your experiment deals with color of the vegetable and what you can tell about the veggies's vitamin c content. So on the "X-Axis" of a graph - you can use the "Green Scale" that we have been talking about.

2. The color of your iodine solution (initially purple) is how you determine how much vitamin C will be the data on the Y-Axis. (And if I remember correctly, the darker it is the less vitamin c it has.)



(Y Axis - Vitamin C Content scale)
(Lightest -10)
|
|
|
|
|
| _________________________________________
Darkest -10)

(Sorry, the post isn't showing correctly on the board. I will post an image of this later today.)

Good Luck!
Willey

fruitypebbles18
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby fruitypebbles18 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 8:32 am

LeungWilley wrote:Hi,
Absolutely, this is data but you do have to present it in a way that shows the result of your experiment.

Here's one example of doing so:

1. Your experiment deals with color of the vegetable and what you can tell about the veggies's vitamin c content. So on the "X-Axis" of a graph - you can use the "Green Scale" that we have been talking about.

2. The color of your iodine solution (initially purple) is how you determine how much vitamin C will be the data on the Y-Axis. (And if I remember correctly, the darker it is the less vitamin c it has.)



(Y Axis - Vitamin C Content scale)
(Lightest -10)




|
|
|
|
| _________________________________________
Darkest -10)

(Sorry, the post isn't showing correctly on the board. I will post an image of this later today.)

Good Luck!
Willey



Ok I really hope I can see the image of that graph bc I’m still a tad bit confused with how a graph with just be based on colors and also, I read a lot of other websites that said that the darker the final product was, that’s the one with the vitamin c, not vise versa like the website said. So from your expert opinion, which one is right ? Thank you so much

LeungWilley
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby LeungWilley » Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:36 am

Hi fruitypebbles18,
Here's the chart that we were talking about:
Veggies Chart Example.pdf
(22.07 KiB) Downloaded 12 times


For the second part of your question about whether higher content of vitamin C = darker, I think you have the perfect setup to prove to yourself one way or the other. If you were to continue to add more vitamin C (i.e. more veggies) into the solution, does it turn darker or lighter? (It sounds like you are already done with the experiment so you may want to come up with a quick version to test this. For example, if you make the iodine solution, you can add vitamin C pill a little bit at a time and you can then complete this proof)

Good Luck!
Willey

fruitypebbles18
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby fruitypebbles18 » Sun Nov 26, 2017 8:50 pm

LeungWilley wrote:Hi fruitypebbles18,
Here's the chart that we were talking about:
Veggies Chart Example.pdf


For the second part of your question about whether higher content of vitamin C = darker, I think you have the perfect setup to prove to yourself one way or the other. If you were to continue to add more vitamin C (i.e. more veggies) into the solution, does it turn darker or lighter? (It sounds like you are already done with the experiment so you may want to come up with a quick version to test this. For example, if you make the iodine solution, you can add vitamin C pill a little bit at a time and you can then complete this proof)

Good Luck!
Willey


i can't really retest so i kinda really need a solid answer of whether or not darker=more vitamin c or not. thank you so much
by the way, with the chart, would I put the color of green im talking about under the x axis of the 1? because i still don't get it. i have a couple more questions.
1) do you know how the iodine indicates the vitamin c? like, what's the science behind it?
2) why does it turn purple? like why purple, why not pink or something
(im almost 100% positive these questions will be asked when my project is judged and i would really like to provide an answer but all the internet researching i did didn't really help. thank you v much

fruitypebbles18
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby fruitypebbles18 » Sun Nov 26, 2017 8:51 pm

fruitypebbles18 wrote:
LeungWilley wrote:Hi fruitypebbles18,
Here's the chart that we were talking about:
Veggies Chart Example.pdf


For the second part of your question about whether higher content of vitamin C = darker, I think you have the perfect setup to prove to yourself one way or the other. If you were to continue to add more vitamin C (i.e. more veggies) into the solution, does it turn darker or lighter? (It sounds like you are already done with the experiment so you may want to come up with a quick version to test this. For example, if you make the iodine solution, you can add vitamin C pill a little bit at a time and you can then complete this proof)

Good Luck!
Willey


i can't really retest so i kinda really need a solid answer of whether or not darker=more vitamin c or not. thank you so much
by the way, with the chart, would I put the color of green im talking about under the x axis of the 1? because i still don't get it. i have a couple more questions.
1) do you know how the iodine indicates the vitamin c? like, what's the science behind it?
2) why does it turn purple? like why purple, why not pink or something
(im almost 100% positive these questions will be asked when my project is judged and i would really like to provide an answer but all the internet researching i did didn't really help. thank you v much


also, i forgot to add, I need to draw my conclusions and results very soon so it really would be helpful to have the darker=more vitamin c or not and why that is. ty again

cumulonimbus
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby cumulonimbus » Sat Dec 02, 2017 3:45 pm

Hi fruitypebbles18,

If you want to find out whether more vitamin C=darker, you could look up the vitamin C contents of the vegetables you tested and compare those values to the darkness that you measured. If the darker ones match up with higher vitamin C contents, then darker probably means more vitamin C. As for why iodine indicates vitamin C, iodine is an oxidant whereas vitamin C is an antioxidant, so the iodine and vitamin C react together and make the solution darker. If less vitamin C is present, less of a reaction occurs so the solution is less dark. You can check this article for more information: http://www.scienceprojectlab.com/vitami ... oject.html
As to why the solution is purple specifically, that has to do with which wavelengths of light are emitted and absorbed by the solution, which has to do with the arrangement of the electrons...that's rather complicated, but this article has a bit of an explanation: https://www.zmescience.com/science/phys ... es-colour/
I hope this is helpful and good luck on your project!

Elena

fruitypebbles18
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby fruitypebbles18 » Fri Dec 08, 2017 6:25 pm

cumulonimbus wrote:Hi fruitypebbles18,

If you want to find out whether more vitamin C=darker, you could look up the vitamin C contents of the vegetables you tested and compare those values to the darkness that you measured. If the darker ones match up with higher vitamin C contents, then darker probably means more vitamin C. As for why iodine indicates vitamin C, iodine is an oxidant whereas vitamin C is an antioxidant, so the iodine and vitamin C react together and make the solution darker. If less vitamin C is present, less of a reaction occurs so the solution is less dark. You can check this article for more information: http://www.scienceprojectlab.com/vitami ... oject.html
As to why the solution is purple specifically, that has to do with which wavelengths of light are emitted and absorbed by the solution, which has to do with the arrangement of the electrons...that's rather complicated, but this article has a bit of an explanation: https://www.zmescience.com/science/phys ... es-colour/
I hope this is helpful and good luck on your project!

Elena



i did so much research on whether dark=more vitamin c and i looked up the vitamin c nutrition facts for all veggies. For Spinach and the leek(my dark veggies), there was more vitamin c but for the celery (one of my light veggies) there was barely 1 mg of vitamin c for iceberg lettuce (my 2nd light veggie) there were only 1.6 mg. (THIS IS ACCORDING TO THE NUTRITION FACTS BUT MY EXPERIMENT SHOWED THAT SPINACH AND LEEK HAD LESS VITAMIN C SO IM REALLY CONFUSED) My gut is to say that dark=more vitamin c. But there are so many sources online that say lighter is more vitamin c. PLEASE HELP MY PROJECT IS GOING TO BE JUDGED IN 2 DAYS. HELP A GIRL OUT

cumulonimbus
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Re: Are Dark Green, Leafy Veggies Higher in Vitamin C Content Than Their Lighter-Colored Counterparts?

Postby cumulonimbus » Sat Dec 09, 2017 1:36 pm

Hi fruitypebbles18,

I found a link to this experiment online: https://www.education.com/science-fair/ ... vitamin-c/
It looks like the same one you are doing, and it seems to say that a darker color means less vitamin C. I'm not sure why your results are opposite, but perhaps you can come up with some sources of error - were the dark green vegetable solutions less concentrated, for example? If you still have some iodine left, you could make solutions of different concentrations of orange juice, which contains lots of vitamin C, and see which solution turns darker so as to ascertain whether darker or lighter=more vitamin C. I hope this helps and I'm sorry that I can't be more definitive about your results!

Elena


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