oss
Posts: 27
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2007 11:53 am

need help on topic!!!

Postby oss » Wed Nov 14, 2007 11:44 pm

I was doing my topic about the effect of colors on heat absorption.
But I lost my interest in the whole project.
Because I guess the method of collecting data wasn't correct.
So I think I need to find out a way to make the last topic looks reasonable.
What I did 4 that topic: I wrap around the jars(filled w/ water) different colored papers and put them under a heat lamp. Then after a while, I measure their changes in temperature. The thing is, I couldn't do all the jars at once. So some of them were exposed to the lamp longer than others. Plus, the data didn't turn out so well (blue jars absorpt more heat than red, which is ridiculous).
Or I should change to another topic (sth that I can do by myself + quick. Sth that doesn't involve any volunteers or expensive materials).

Can someone help me please. I'm very frustrated!!!!
Thanks a lot for all your help =^.^=

EmilyDolson
Former Expert
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 3:33 pm
Occupation: Student

Postby EmilyDolson » Thu Nov 15, 2007 12:21 am

Hi, oss,

It sounds like you have an interesting question! I know, from much experience, how frustrating setbacks can be, but I think you can overcome this one.

It is essential to this project that all of the jars be exposed to the exact same amount of light for the same amount of time. Since you cannot fit them all under the light at once, and such an arrangment would probably result in uneven heating, anyway, I would suggest that you test each jar seperately. Choose a set amount of time, such as 1 hour, and leave each jar under the lamp far that amount of time. Make sure to place all of them in exactly the same spot. Use a timer or stopwatch to make sure that you leave each jar under the heat for the correct amount of time. After a jar isdone heating, measure and record the temperature, and move on to the next jar.

Some other considerations: make sure that all of the water starts out at the same temperature, and that the temperature in the room where you are performing the experiment is approximately the same for all of your tests.

Good job checking your data for consistancy with scientific facts! This is a really important step in data analysis. However, make sure you are taking into account what shade of each color you are using. A dark blue, which could be fairly close to black, could easily absorb more heat than a light red. It is also possible that this issue was the result of uncontrolled data, and that you will get results closer to those you are excpecting if you modify your procedure. This would be and interesting thing to look at in your new data.

You have clearly put a lot of time into this topic. If you are still interested in it, I would reccomend sticking with it. However, if you have become more interested in something else, and have time, by all means switch. It is most important that you are really inveted in your project. What sorts of topics are you interested in?

I hope this helped and made sense! Feel free to ask anymore questions that come up, and good luck!

- Emily
Reach for the stars and, if you miss, grab the moon!

oss
Posts: 27
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2007 11:53 am

Postby oss » Thu Nov 15, 2007 12:26 am

Thanks for your answer.
what are some other topics that you recommend??
I'm interested in physics in general.

EmilyDolson wrote:Hi, oss,

It sounds like you have an interesting question! I know, from much experience, how frustrating setbacks can be, but I think you can overcome this one.

It is essential to this project that all of the jars be exposed to the exact same amount of light for the same amount of time. Since you cannot fit them all under the light at once, and such an arrangment would probably result in uneven heating, anyway, I would suggest that you test each jar seperately. Choose a set amount of time, such as 1 hour, and leave each jar under the lamp far that amount of time. Make sure to place all of them in exactly the same spot. Use a timer or stopwatch to make sure that you leave each jar under the heat for the correct amount of time. After a jar isdone heating, measure and record the temperature, and move on to the next jar.

Some other considerations: make sure that all of the water starts out at the same temperature, and that the temperature in the room where you are performing the experiment is approximately the same for all of your tests.

Good job checking your data for consistancy with scientific facts! This is a really important step in data analysis. However, make sure you are taking into account what shade of each color you are using. A dark blue, which could be fairly close to black, could easily absorb more heat than a light red. It is also possible that this issue was the result of uncontrolled data, and that you will get results closer to those you are excpecting if you modify your procedure. This would be and interesting thing to look at in your new data.

You have clearly put a lot of time into this topic. If you are still interested in it, I would reccomend sticking with it. However, if you have become more interested in something else, and have time, by all means switch. It is most important that you are really inveted in your project. What sorts of topics are you interested in?

I hope this helped and made sense! Feel free to ask anymore questions that come up, and good luck!

- Emily
Thanks a lot for all your help =^.^=

EmilyDolson
Former Expert
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 3:33 pm
Occupation: Student

Postby EmilyDolson » Thu Nov 15, 2007 12:40 am

Wow, that is a very broad topic area. For some ideas to help you start narrowing it down, I would reccomend checking out the Science Buddies list of Physics project ideas: http://www.sciencebuddies.com/mentoring/project_ideas/home_Phys.shtml?from=Home. It has a good range of projects from all over the subject of physics. Hopefully something will catch your imagination! If you need more help with your project, ask away!

Good luck!

-Emily
Reach for the stars and, if you miss, grab the moon!

megaman
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2007 8:43 pm

Postby megaman » Thu Nov 15, 2007 9:03 pm

I find that with science fair projects the ones that are good are the ones that people really enjoy. so if ou need a project think about your hobbies and what type of things you find interesting. personally I found that i like to make things so awhile back i did a science fair about catapults involving different types and numbers of bungees. if you still need ideas after finding your hobbies and things you enjoy then post some of your hobbies and things you enjoy and I will try to help you with some ideas.


Return to “Grades 6-8: Physical Science”