math_nerd126
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Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2016 8:04 am
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Tesla Coil

Postby math_nerd126 » Tue Jan 12, 2016 10:41 am

Can you explain to me at a grade 8 level, what Coulombs Law is? For my Grade 8. year science fair project I have decided to do it on the Tesla Coil. But, in order for me determine and measure the "Unit of current", I need to figure out "Coulomb per second". Which is the solution to Coulombs law per second. I'm also planning to build a miniature Tesla Coil that functions.

HowardE
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Re: Tesla Coil

Postby HowardE » Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:03 am

The short version is that Coulomb's law explains that for any two charged particles, the force that each exerts on the other is a function of the distance between them. Imagine that you really like pizza. Someone comes into the room with one and you smell it. You become interested in the pizza and the close you are to the pizza, the more you can smell it and more you'd like a slice. A positively and negatively charged particle would be attracted to each other also, and if they get closer to each other, the attraction between them gets closer. Replace the pizza with really overcooked broccoli. This is more like two positive or two negatively charged particles. The closer they are to each other, the more each one tries to get away.

A coulomb in electrical energy is a specific amount of charge. At a given point, the number of charged particles that pass by is measured in coulombs, or in a wire, the amount of charge passed down the wire is measured in coulombs. If you want to know how many coulombs pass by in one second, you express that in amperes, or amps.

Tesla coils are fun but please be very careful when you make one. They generate high voltages which can be dangerous if not handled properly.

Howard

dawda
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Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2016 4:22 am
Occupation: Other Adult

Re: Tesla Coil

Postby dawda » Tue Dec 13, 2016 4:25 am

HowardE wrote:The short version is that Coulomb's law explains that for any two charged particles, the force that each exerts on the other is a function of the distance between them. Imagine that you really like pizza. Someone comes into the room with one and you smell it. You become interested in the pizza and the close you are to the pizza, the more you can smell it and more you'd like a slice. A positively and negatively charged particle would be attracted to each other also, and if they get closer to each other, the attraction between them gets closer. Replace the pizza with really overcooked broccoli. This is more like two positive or two negatively charged particles. The closer they are to each other, the more each one tries to get away.

A coulomb in electrical energy is a specific amount of charge. At a given point, the number of charged particles that pass by is measured in coulombs, or in a wire, the amount of charge passed down the wire is measured in coulombs. If you want to know how many coulombs pass by in one second, you express that in amperes, or amps.

Tesla coils are fun but please be very careful when you make one. They generate high voltages which can be dangerous if not handled properly.

Howard


Hi Howard, Thank you for a such simple example of Coulomb's law! It helped me to understand better its essence :wink:


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