arama
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jul 14, 2019 2:11 pm
Occupation: Student

Specific Heat

Postby arama » Sun Jul 14, 2019 2:14 pm

You perform the following calorimetry experiment in the physics laboratory. The objective is to determine the specific heat of copper. You use a calorimeter containing water, and do the experiment in three parts. Before the specific heat of copper can be
determined, it is necessary to know the specific heat of the calorimeter. This value can be found by performing an experiment with a metal of known specific heat. Iron will be used for this purpose. The specific heats of iron and water are Ciron = 450.0 J/kg·K and Cwater= 4180 J/kg·K. The calorimeter is well insulated, so no heat is gained from or lost to the surroundings.

a. First, you heat up an iron ball of mass 50.0 g from 23.0°C to 100.0°C.
Determine the amount of energy required. [2]

b. Next, you drop the hot iron ball into a 35.0-g calorimeter containing 85.0 g
of water. The calorimeter and water start at a temperature of 20.0°C. You
measure the final temperature of the system to be 24.4°C. Determine the
specific heat of the calorimeter. [3]

c. Now that the heat capacity of the calorimeter has been determined, it is
possible to experimentally determine the specific heat of copper. You use
the same calorimeter, again containing 85.0 g of water at 20.0°C. Now,
you heat a copper ball of mass 45.0 g to 100.0°C and drop it into the
calorimeter, and then you measure the final temperature of the system to
be 23.4°C. Determine the specific heat of copper. [3]

d. You remove the copper ball and empty out the water. The empty
calorimeter is now at 23.4°C. You add 25.0 g of water at 7.5°C. What is
the final temperature of the system? [2]

LeungWilley
Expert
Posts: 350
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 11:15 pm
Occupation: Electrical Engineer

Re: Specific Heat

Postby LeungWilley » Thu Jul 18, 2019 1:57 pm

Hi arama,
I am afraid I don't understand what are your questions. Can you elaborate please?

Also, sciencebuddies have an experiment that deals with Calorimeter and Specific Heat Capacity. The background information may be useful to you. Here's the link:

https://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project-ideas/Chem_p092/chemistry/put-some-energy-into-it-use-a-calorimeter-to-measure-the-heat-capacity-of-water#background

Good Luck and please post again if there's anything else we can do to help.
Willey


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