x-Alex-x
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2007 2:30 am

Help -- Method For Measuring Prejudice

Postby x-Alex-x » Sat Aug 11, 2007 2:36 am

Hello -- I am researching and partaking in an experiment to measure prejudice against teenage steryotypes,, But I can't hink of a suitable scale or control to measure with.
Any Ideas?

Thanks__xx

tdaly
Former Expert
Posts: 1415
Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2003 11:27 pm
Occupation: Planetary Scientist

Postby tdaly » Fri Aug 17, 2007 7:45 pm

Hmm. Interesting topic, though fraught with complex issues. Nearly every social science project needs huge numbers of individuals from which to collect data, and that involves having each participant fill out an informed consent form; your methodology will also need to pass a review board before you can work with humans.

Why don't you post back with your method as you have it designed now, and then I can take a look at it and be able to give you better advice.

I will say this from the outset, however. This will be a very hard project to do and it very well may be impossible to get meaningful data. This is not to discourage you, but just to make you aware that this will take a great deal of work. I'm sure it will be interesting!
All the best,
Terik

ChrisG
Former Expert
Posts: 1019
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2005 11:43 am
Occupation: Research Hydrologist

Postby ChrisG » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:58 am

Alex,
Usually it's best to add questions like this to your existing thread instead of opening a new one. Using the existing thread allows experts to see the background of your work and to understand your problem.

For those who haven't seen it, here is the original thread:
http://www.sciencebuddies.com/mentoring ... php?t=2736

Can you be a little more specific with your question? By "scale" do you mean some way to quantify people's responses? What sort of ideas have you come up with, and why are you not satisfied with those ideas? The type of control you will need depends on the experiment, so it would be helpful to hear as much detail about that as possible.


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