ram19
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Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2013 11:45 pm
Occupation: Student:9th grade

Eyewitness testimony

Postby ram19 » Mon Dec 09, 2013 12:11 am

I started my project a few days ago and my question is:How accurately can people retell their observations about something if they are asked about it?
Is this okay?
I know my project is due a lot later but there are some deadlines and one of them which is tomorrow is my notes,question, and keywords?
So please hurry

dcnick96
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Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2007 7:59 pm

Re: Eyewitness testimony

Postby dcnick96 » Mon Dec 09, 2013 8:22 pm

This is an excellent topic which as real-world applications in many areas. Have you checked out this link?
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/HumBeh_p014.shtml#summary

If you're having problems with where to start on your questions and keywords, perhaps the link will help you come up with initial ideas.

I hope this helps. Be sure to write back if you have any questions. If you are still unsure of keywords a/o questions, let us know your initial thoughts, and we can go from there.

Good luck!
Deana

ram19
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2013 11:45 pm
Occupation: Student:9th grade

Re: Eyewitness testimony

Postby ram19 » Tue Dec 10, 2013 12:10 am

It does actually and I found a lot of key words and sources too :D but I don't think I have all and also I need to make notes out if this so I am kind confused on how to make notes out of websites. Any pointers? I uploaded my sources and keywords so kindly please read them. I also made some questions for my background research worksheet but I am confused at which ones are relevant and which are not. So any help would be appreciated! :D
Attachments
Sources, Keywords and Questions.docx
(25.17 KiB) Downloaded 159 times

dcnick96
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Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2007 7:59 pm

Re: Eyewitness testimony

Postby dcnick96 » Wed Dec 11, 2013 5:57 am

I think you have an excellent start to your research and are hitting all the key points to get started. One area I can think of you may want to research: if you are going to concentrate on eyewitness testimony (v. other purposes of recalling information), why is accurate memory important? Can you find statistics showing how often people are falsely accused and / or convicted due to inaccurate eyewitness testimony? Researching this will help you answer, "why is the information in your experiment important?"

Remember, the purpose of conducting an experiment is to learn something new. That means you may not think of all the pertinent questions right away. Begin your research with the questions you have already formulated and, perhaps, what I recommended. This will help you identify what you should concentrate on, what questions may not be as important, and I'm sure new questions will arise. Take your first source, for example. It mentions several key terms and concepts you haven't necessarily included in your key terms and questions.
1. They use the terms "storage, retention, and recall," while your key terms include "encoding, storage, and retrieval." Are these the same things? Probably, but you won't know without further reading. If they are the same, your notes should include different terms are used for the same concept.
2. "The influences of the retention stage can corrode memory via three factors." They briefly describe the three factors on this website, but learning more about these factors may help you understand why eyewitness testimony isn't always accurate.
3. Sequential v. Simultaneous line-ups. Same as my previous statement. While briefly described on this website, further reading may help you determine whether this topic is important to elaborate on in your final report.

Your background research will be an iterative process...develop key words, read, discard irrelevant topics and formulate new questions, read further, etc. This iterative process is perfectly normal when conducting an experiment!

The purpose of taking notes is to document what you've done throughout your experiment. At this stage, notes should consist of what you already have in the word document and perhaps a 1-2 sentence summary for each of your sources. Whenever I conduct an experiment, a brief summary of each source helps me remember which source to return to if I need more information on a specific topic. As your list of sources grow, this can save you time!

As you continue your research, be sure to note all sources, key words, and questions you investigated, even if you determine a key word or question will not be investigated during this experiment. Documenting it shows you at least thought about it. If you determine a key word or question will not be further investigated, document why. Examples include:
1. A topic that is beyond the scope of your experiment.
2. While it may be relevant to other uses of memory, it isn't important for studying eyewitness testimony.

As you progress in your research and decide what is / is not important to cover in your report, you should start building an outline for your report. This should also be included in your notes.

All aspects of your experiment should be documented in a lab notebook. Read here for more information.
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_laboratory_notebook.shtml

I hope this helps. Let us know if you have any more questions.
Good luck!
Deana


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