Misdals
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 3:37 pm

Mass VS Shell Structure - Why there is a difference scientif

Postby Misdals » Mon Feb 12, 2007 4:02 pm

My daughter has put together her science fair project, but forgot to think about the fact that she needs to have an explanation of the "why's". She has used a wooden hockey stick(mass) & a hollow (shell) one & is measuring the distance a hollow ball or solid puck will go using both sticks using the same force. What we haven't been able to figure out is how to explain scientifically why this is. I have searched online for her & found nothing, but perhaps I am not looking for the right words, etc.

Could you possibly help us or point in right direction. This is due in 2 days & all else is done, but she forgot this aspect.

Thanks so much!
My daughter is doing project on mass vs shell structure, using hockey sticks & a ball & puck. We are measuring distance, but need help to explain why there is a difference when same force used

Louise
Former Expert
Posts: 921
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 2:17 pm

Re: Mass VS Shell Structure - Why there is a difference scie

Postby Louise » Mon Feb 12, 2007 5:24 pm

Misdals wrote:My daughter has put together her science fair project, but forgot to think about the fact that she needs to have an explanation of the "why's". She has used a wooden hockey stick(mass) & a hollow (shell) one & is measuring the distance a hollow ball or solid puck will go using both sticks using the same force. What we haven't been able to figure out is how to explain scientifically why this is. I have searched online for her & found nothing, but perhaps I am not looking for the right words, etc.

Could you possibly help us or point in right direction. This is due in 2 days & all else is done, but she forgot this aspect.

Thanks so much!


Maybe I am missing something, but what is "same force"? The mass or other physical properites of the hockey stick has an impact on the force. If I hit you as hard as I can with a feather, and then the same with a baseball bat, I assure you, a different force will be felt.
There is a transfering of force from the arm to the stick and stick to the puck. The material properties of the stick are important!

Look, for example, at the scandals involving "corked" baseball bats. There are a couple different explanations that I've seen- light bat can be swung harder, springiness of the bat transfers more energy, etc. Don't know which is right, but searching along these lines may lead you to stuff that helps.

Louise


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