BGILLASPY
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2005 3:41 pm

HEAT VS SUGAR

Postby BGILLASPY » Mon Oct 17, 2005 3:43 pm

I AM TRYING TO FIND 60 FACTS ON HOW HEAT AFFECTS SUGAR
I AM TRYING TO FIND 60 FACTS ON HOW HEAT AFFECTS SUGAR

Ceal Craig
Posts: 106
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 6:40 pm

Re: HEAT VS SUGAR

Postby Ceal Craig » Tue Oct 18, 2005 9:05 am

BGILLASPY wrote:I AM TRYING TO FIND 60 FACTS ON HOW HEAT AFFECTS SUGAR


hi!
:)

What kind of facts are you looking for? Have you identified any facts of which you are unclear? What do you think might be some? Have you checked some of the research places mentioned in this forum?

Could you expand this a bit more so we can help better?

Thanks!

Ceal Craig
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agoshell
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2005 11:02 am

Heat Vs sugar

Postby agoshell » Sun Nov 20, 2005 11:24 am

I am starting a project measuring the effects of different types of water temperature on sugar. I am planning on using a cup of cold water, tepid and boiling water on a cup of sugar. My experiment will be to determine what percentage of sugar did not mix with the water in each experiment. I have to find research on the subject matter. Can you please provide advice and also websites I can research.

I AM IN THE 7TH GRADE AND MY DAD HELPED ME WRITE THIS EMAIL. HE HAS TOLD ME I AM DOING THE REST OF THE RESEARCH ON THE PROJECT BY MYSELF.

Thanks for your help

Jim Lewandowski
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2003 12:55 pm

Supersaturation

Postby Jim Lewandowski » Wed Nov 23, 2005 12:28 pm

Hi there,
it sounds like you are trying to do an experiment that deals with how much sugar you can disolve in a fixed quantity of water. I recall doing a similar experiment in high school that has quite a dramatic effect when the mixture becomes supersaturated. The amount of sugar a quantity of water will be able to absorb will depend on its temperature. If you cool down a solution that is at its saturation point you might then get the solution to begin a "rapid crystallization" where the solution will solidify almost instantly. This is very cool and you should try to make this happen.

I hope this helps.

Here are a couple of links,

Basic Crystalization link.
http://crystal.uah.edu/~carter/protein/crystal.htm

A calculation site:
http://www.sugartech.co.za/ssc/index.php

Advanced site on the same experiment you are performing:
http://www.univ-reims.fr/Externes/AVH/c0108.htm

Recent paper on some more advanced research in this area:
http://www.univ-reims.fr/Externes/AVH/AVH10Bubnik.pdf
Jim Lewandowski
Engineering Physicist
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

Jim Lewandowski
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2003 12:55 pm

Sugar probably will not crystallize "rapidly" but.

Postby Jim Lewandowski » Wed Nov 23, 2005 12:45 pm

The experiment can also be performed with salt, a comarison of the amounts of salt vs. sugar disolved in water could also be interesting.

Those previous links might be a bit advanced, a google search for sugar experiment will lead to many links. Here a couple more basic experiments.

Salt crystal growing experiment
http://chemistry.about.com/od/growingcr ... ystals.htm


http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/experiment/00000078


Hope this helps.

Jim

Artshark
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2005 12:47 pm

Re: Sugar probably will not crystallize "rapidly"

Postby Artshark » Thu Dec 01, 2005 1:21 pm

Jim Lewandowski wrote:The experiment can also be performed with salt, a comarison of the amounts of salt vs. sugar disolved in water could also be interesting.




No offense, but that isn't exactly feasible- being a carbohydrate, sugar will not break down by ionization in water into soluble molecules. NaCl, with, into Na and Cl ions. Now, what you can do with sugar in water is stir it so it reaches equilibrium and is visibly 'mixed in' with the water. However, to make the distinction, unlike the Na, Cl, and H20 molecules, the C6H12O6 did not bond with the water.


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