x inactivation in tortioseshell cats

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x inactivation in tortioseshell cats

Postby sciencekat » Sun Apr 28, 2013 3:23 pm

Hi im having trouble doing this project with the hypothesis and the variables.
For my hypothesis i have 'If Xinactivatiion causes the colors of a tortoiseshell cat by inactivating one x chromosome, then the orange fur color will show up the most, bacause the orange allel is dominant'.
My independent variable is the cats' genes (which i dont know if i print out pics) and the dependent variable is the cats coat color (phenotype).
How would i do this project with the info that i have or would i need to change my hypothesis? thanks
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Project Question: if Xinactivation affects tortioseshell cats coat color
Project Due Date: may 10th
Project Status: I am conducting my research

Re: x inactivation in tortioseshell cats

Postby donnahardy2 » Sun Apr 28, 2013 5:24 pm

Hi,

Welcome to Science Buddies! I think you are doing this excellent project from the Science Buddies website:

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... p022.shtml

Since you don’t know the genetic make-up of the cat in this project, your independent variable is the different cats, and the dependent variable is the color in the 12 segments of the face of each cat.

Your hypothesis is good, it gives you a specific outcome to test for in your analysis ahd it is a reasonable hypothesis.

Please post again in this topic if you have any other questions. Let us know about your results.


Donna Hardy
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Re: x inactivation in tortioseshell cats

Postby sarahlaugtug » Tue Apr 30, 2013 12:05 pm

Hello Sciencekat,
Your project set up is off to an excellent start! Here are some additional resources to add to Donna's advice.
Here are examples of what independent and dependent variables are:
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... #checklist
As Donna mentioned: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... evariables
the independent variable (the variable that you change) will be the different cat pictures, and the
dependent variable (your OBSERVATIONS of the changes made to the independent variable) will be the changes or differences in face coloration.

Here is a checklist to make sure you have created a good hypothesis:
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... #checklist

We look forward to hearing how your project goes!
Always remain curious,
Sarah
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Re: x inactivation in tortioseshell cats

Postby sciencekat » Wed May 08, 2013 5:38 pm

Hey thanks for the advice. i finshed doing the experiment for this project but my results are mixed. of all the sections of all the cats, 42.2% were black, 30% were orange, and 27.7% were mixed (both black and orange). as you can see there is not a significant difference.
would my conclusion be that black show up more in a tortiose shell cat or the color patterns of tortioseshell cats are random ?:?: (im leaning more to the second one)
thanks. :roll:
sciencekat
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Apr 26, 2013 5:26 pm
Occupation: student 8thgrade
Project Question: if Xinactivation affects tortioseshell cats coat color
Project Due Date: may 10th
Project Status: I am conducting my research

Re: x inactivation in tortioseshell cats

Postby heatherL » Thu May 09, 2013 3:27 pm

Hi Sciencekat,

Both Donna and Sarah have given you some excellent advice, and it sounds like you have successfully completed your project. Congratulations!

When you look at the numbers as a whole, they do appear fairly random. (There is a way to find out using statistics, so let me know if you are interested in learning about that.) However, you probably recorded values for each of the 12 regions of the face. Did you see any patterns for each region (e.g., more black on the nose or more orange on the ears)?

Try graphing your data according to facial region to see if you have any patterns there.

Please post back (in this same thread), and we'll help you interpret your data!

Heather
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Re: x inactivation in tortioseshell cats

Postby sciencekat » Thu May 09, 2013 5:21 pm

thanks. I actually divided the face into 9 regions but anyway black ears were common so were black noses. orange were more common around the eyes. otherwise its pretty mixed.
sciencekat
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Apr 26, 2013 5:26 pm
Occupation: student 8thgrade
Project Question: if Xinactivation affects tortioseshell cats coat color
Project Due Date: may 10th
Project Status: I am conducting my research

Re: x inactivation in tortioseshell cats

Postby heatherL » Thu May 09, 2013 8:25 pm

Great! There are your patterns. You can show how black is more common at the nose and ears, and orange is more common around the eyes.

Let us know if you have more questions.

Best,
Heather
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Re: x inactivation in tortioseshell cats

Postby sarahlaugtug » Wed May 15, 2013 5:21 pm

Hello Sciencekat,

I'm not sure if you have completed your final project, but if not, here are some resources on what to include in your data analysis/ graphs:
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... l#overview
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... checklists

Heather had the idea to compare regions of the face between cats, rather than percentages of black and orange regions as a whole, this is an excellent idea because you are trying to find out if the facial patterns are consistent between different cats, which means you are comparing region 1 of cat 1, region 1 of cat 2, and so on. What does it mean if all cats had orange patterns in region 1? Does that data mean that the orange gene allele is pre-determined or random? Discuss this in your results section.

After you do your charting and data analysis, you can come up with your conclusion. Your conclusion will reflect your observations/ results of the different regions and colors of the cats as well as to how it compares to your hypothesis. In your conclusion, you will want to ask yourself: Did my results support my hypothesis? Explain your reasons for why you think it did not come out how you expected OR why your data supports your hypothesis. Here, you will talk about X-inactivation of the orange allele being random or pre-determined. To refresh, you can review your research as well as the science project background research section on Science Buddies: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... background
Use the checklist in the link below to help you with the conclusion:
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... ml#keyinfo
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... l#overview

Hope that helps. Please let us know how your project is coming along and if you need more help.
Always remain curious,
Sarah
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