Is Specific density of a solution important?

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Is Specific density of a solution important?

Postby leenamjulee » Sat May 10, 2014 8:44 am

I'm trying to do an experiment on blood clotting which idea is on this website http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-f ... ml#summary
At the procedure tap #3, It says to add only 2g of sodium alginate.
Is there any reason why it's that particular amount?
Same with #4 d.

Also if the sodium citrate is added enough, would the gelatinous ball not be formed?
and how much would i need to add to to make it happen?
leenamjulee
 
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Project Question: Blood Clotting to the Rescue: How to Stop Too Much Blood from Flowing
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Re: Is Specific density of a solution important?

Postby Adean2001 » Fri May 16, 2014 7:15 am

I have never done the experiment before, so I can't attest to the amounts called for in the procedure. It's likely that those specific quantities give the best results (or use the smallest amount of chemicals to give adequate results). But, if you're curious (and have extra material), you can always try to add more/less and see if the results differ from the original experiment. That's what science is all about, testing different ways of doing things and seeing what happens. I encourage you to do the experiment as written and then to do it a few more times (if you wish), with different amounts of chemicals to see what happens. I wouldn't say this about all experiments, but sodium alginate and sodium citrate are not highly reactive or dangerous chemicals, so I say give it a shot if you feel like it.

Here are the material safety data sheets for sodium alginate and sodium citrate. Looks like you should make sure to wear protective goggles and avoid inhaling the dust. Otherwise, they looks pretty safe to use:
http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9924955

http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9927264
Adean2001
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Re: Is Specific density of a solution important?

Postby leenamjulee » Thu May 29, 2014 7:00 am

Adean2001 wrote:I have never done the experiment before, so I can't attest to the amounts called for in the procedure. It's likely that those specific quantities give the best results (or use the smallest amount of chemicals to give adequate results). But, if you're curious (and have extra material), you can always try to add more/less and see if the results differ from the original experiment. That's what science is all about, testing different ways of doing things and seeing what happens. I encourage you to do the experiment as written and then to do it a few more times (if you wish), with different amounts of chemicals to see what happens. I wouldn't say this about all experiments, but sodium alginate and sodium citrate are not highly reactive or dangerous chemicals, so I say give it a shot if you feel like it.

Here are the material safety data sheets for sodium alginate and sodium citrate. Looks like you should make sure to wear protective goggles and avoid inhaling the dust. Otherwise, they looks pretty safe to use:
http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9924955

http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9927264


Thank you for your wonderful reply. I am totally with you on the thought that science is all about knowing what we are curious about. Even I have submitted my report, I think this could help me prepare for the question which judges are going to ask :D^^
leenamjulee
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat May 10, 2014 7:18 am
Occupation: Strudent 10th grade
Project Question: Blood Clotting to the Rescue: How to Stop Too Much Blood from Flowing
Project Due Date: 2014/5/16
Project Status: I am conducting my research


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