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Areas of Science Geology
Difficulty
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
*Note: For this science project you will need to develop your own experimental procedure. Use the information in the summary tab as a starting place. If you would like to discuss your ideas or need help troubleshooting, use the Ask An Expert forum. Our Experts won't do the work for you, but they will make suggestions and offer guidance if you come to them with specific questions.

If you want a Project Idea with full instructions, please pick one without an asterisk (*) at the end of the title.

Abstract

Visit the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program to find out about global patterns of earthquake incidents (USGS, 2006). Can mapping earthquakes help identify fault lines? They also have a list of science fair project ideas. Another great resource for earthquake-oriented science fair projects is by Jeffery Barker (Barker, 1994). Build a model to study the forces of an earthquake using sandpaper-covered blocks. What are the forces involved? How are stress and friction in balance along a fault line? How would changing the grit of the sandpaper affect your model? You can also use a Slinky to investigate the difference between P and S seismic waves. How do they compare? You can also do an experiment to test different building designs for earthquake stability. Which designs are most stable? (Barker, 1994; USGS, 2006)

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General citation information is provided here. Be sure to check the formatting, including capitalization, for the method you are using and update your citation, as needed.

MLA Style

Science Buddies Staff. "Earthquakes." Science Buddies, 11 July 2020, https://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project-ideas/Geo_p030/geology/earthquakes?class=AQXFO_O5gzaB29v0fZdV6R293dRGvBIhY35y_tcgjXh-D8U5_QeBuJ93UasGRmH6QzK7eWK1P6AtC4Y_HxMgHZHa0mUF2MyEbpsWmZulbN8J4A. Accessed 12 Aug. 2020.

APA Style

Science Buddies Staff. (2020, July 11). Earthquakes. Retrieved from https://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project-ideas/Geo_p030/geology/earthquakes?class=AQXFO_O5gzaB29v0fZdV6R293dRGvBIhY35y_tcgjXh-D8U5_QeBuJ93UasGRmH6QzK7eWK1P6AtC4Y_HxMgHZHa0mUF2MyEbpsWmZulbN8J4A


Last edit date: 2020-07-11

Experimental Procedure

For this science project you will need to develop your own experimental procedure. Use the information in the summary tab as a starting place. If you would like to discuss your ideas or need help troubleshooting, use the Ask An Expert forum. Our Experts won't do the work for you, but they will make suggestions and offer guidance if you come to them with specific questions.

If you want a Project Idea with full instructions, please pick one without an asterisk (*) at the end of the title.

Share your story with Science Buddies!

I did this project Yes, I Did This Project! Please log in (or create a free account) to let us know how things went.

Ask an Expert

The Ask an Expert Forum is intended to be a place where students can go to find answers to science questions that they have been unable to find using other resources. If you have specific questions about your science fair project or science fair, our team of volunteer scientists can help. Our Experts won't do the work for you, but they will make suggestions, offer guidance, and help you troubleshoot.

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