Tornadoes *

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Areas of Science Weather & Atmosphere
Difficulty
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
*Note: For this science project you will need to develop your own experimental procedure. Use the information in the summary tab as a starting place. If you would like to discuss your ideas or need help troubleshooting, use the Ask An Expert forum. Our Experts won't do the work for you, but they will make suggestions and offer guidance if you come to them with specific questions.

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Abstract

Tornadoes are a very destructive weather phenomenon that is very hard to predict. Certain weather conditions can indicate if a tornado is likely to occur, but the path that the tornado will take is completely unpredictable. Storm chasers are people who chase tornadoes and try to capture them on film or video. They often have a sense of predicting where and when a tornado will strike, but the best images are also due to a bit of luck and survival instinct. Even though tornadoes are unpredictable, there are some trends you can investigate. Is there a tornado season? Is there a regional distribution of tornado activity? Where are the tornado hot-spots? You can make your own tornado in a bottle, to test the effect of two temperatures coming together to form a tornado. You can also investigate dirt devils, which are tiny tornadoes that occur on flat, dusty and dry desert soils. (NCAR, 2006; NOAA, 2006; Weather Underground, 2006; WMO, 2006)

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MLA Style

Science Buddies Staff. "Tornadoes." Science Buddies, 28 July 2017, https://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project-ideas/Weather_p024/weather-atmosphere/tornadoes?class=AQUdDFBau9DtYnioiThFyFTGnwaSOCO0ew3D_5M6pVq2_7ELRcyeOdbu-P1A-mcsTEsKZKee-EDyWGiHAeogDtAO. Accessed 15 Dec. 2019.

APA Style

Science Buddies Staff. (2017, July 28). Tornadoes. Retrieved from https://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project-ideas/Weather_p024/weather-atmosphere/tornadoes?class=AQUdDFBau9DtYnioiThFyFTGnwaSOCO0ew3D_5M6pVq2_7ELRcyeOdbu-P1A-mcsTEsKZKee-EDyWGiHAeogDtAO


Last edit date: 2017-07-28

Bibliography

  • NCAR, 2006. "NCAR Science and Education Outreach Page," National Center for Atmospheric Research. [accessed: 3/1/2006]
    https://scied.ucar.edu/.
  • NOAA, 2006. "NOAA Homepage," National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. [accessed: 3/1/2006] http://www.noaa.gov/.
  • The Weather Underground, Inc, 2005. "The Weather Underground," Ann Arbor, MI. [accessed: 12/13/05] http://www.wunderground.com/.
  • WMO, 2006. "World Meteorological Organization," WMO, United Nations. [accessed: 3/1/2006] https://public.wmo.int/en.

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Experimental Procedure

For this science project you will need to develop your own experimental procedure. Use the information in the summary tab as a starting place. If you would like to discuss your ideas or need help troubleshooting, use the Ask An Expert forum. Our Experts won't do the work for you, but they will make suggestions and offer guidance if you come to them with specific questions.

If you want a Project Idea with full instructions, please pick one without an asterisk (*) at the end of the title.

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