Experiment with Video Games Science Projects (28 results)

Make your own video and computer games, or explore how video games impact how people think, remember, and move. Write a list of instructions (a program) to build a game, or observe how volunteers play games.

Science Fair Project Idea
Everyday, people in your city or town walk to school, ride the bus and go to work, and go to the library to research their science fair projects. But what if the library was 20 miles away from your home? Would you go to the library? What if there were no police officers or fire stations in your city, or if they were located across town, away from where most people live? What if there were no movie theaters? What would you do with your friends? Many people really like living in cities in which… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
"Pow!" Wow, what an awesome punch that character has! Ever wondered what goes into making a punch look good in a video game? Or any other character motion sequence, for that matter? Try this science fair project for a firsthand look at how art and timing can create memorable game action. Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Do you love playing video and computer games? Do you dream of someday creating your own? With this science fair project you can turn that "someday" wish into a "today" reality! Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Male or female? Fat or skinny? Outgoing or quiet? What is your stereotype of a "gamer"? Do your friends have the same mental picture of gamers? How about your parents? This science fair project will help you examine whether the stereotypes of "gamers" actually matches the reality of who plays video games. Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever watched an inexperienced video game player pick up a controller and start playing a game? Often the player bumbles around trying to figure out which button makes the onscreen character jump, run, turn left, or perform other actions. Some games are different though, they have control schemes that are more real-world based. Examples include Nintendo® WiiTM Tennis where you swing the Wii remote like a tennis racket and Activision's Guitar Hero® where you can play with a… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Learning to play an instrument can be a lot of fun, especially when you can pretend to be a rock star as you learn! In this science fair project, you will study how your score in a music video game changes as you play and practice. You'll need a video game where you use a controller shaped like a musical instrument. Two examples include Guitar Hero and Rock Band, but there may be more! In these games, playing requires nothing more than a sense of the music's beat, and ridiculously fast fingers,… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
There are many different types, also called genres, of computer and video games, including racing, fighting, sports, adventure, and puzzle games. Do some genres of games appeal more to males and other genres more to females? Survey your classmates and find out in this science fair project! Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever tried rubbing your stomach and patting your head at the same time? What about doing your homework or studying for your math test while watching television? It is tough to focus on a task when you are distracted doing something else, isn't it? In this science fair project, you will investigate how distractions affect your focus on a task, such as driving, by looking at how gaming scores are affected as you're talking on a cell phone or having a conversation with a friend. Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever heard someone described as a video game addict? Do you think video game addicts actually exist? You can determine that for yourself in this science fair project by examining real data from a California research scientist for over 3,000 video game players! Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
When you picture video games, you probably picture realistic figures, a lot of color, and a lot of detail, right? Those descriptions do not really describe video games from the early 1980's. So why do video games today look better than video games from the 80's? One major change between then and now is the number of pixels, or dots on the screen, used to represent video game objects. When Nintendo® first introduced the Super Mario Bros game for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) in… Read more
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Free science fair projects.