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My Science Project Topic

Information

This page is one of many Science Buddies' resources educators can assign their students using Google Classroom. Educators, to learn more about how to make assignments please visit our FAQ page. Visit the Google Classroom Science Project Assignments page for an index of all possible Science Buddies assignments, including interactive science project submission pages and quizzes.

Review

A good science project topic should be something you:

  • are interested in enough to spend several weeks thinking about.
  • can find reference materials about.
  • can measure.
  • can experiment on safely and with the materials and equipment available to you.

Once you have a topic, write a scientific question. Try to start your question with one of these words who, what, when, where, why, or how.

Avoid brand comparisons, topics that are simply surveys about a group of people, and ideas that are difficult to control and measure.

For more information and examples of what topics to avoid check out our page on choosing your science fair project question.

Submission Form
1. Choose the option that best applies to you:
2. What is the question you are trying to answer in your science project?
3. Will your project require any safety equipment or have any steps you need to follow to stay safe during your experimenting?
If you answered "yes", describe what you will need to do to stay safe during your project.
Self-check
To self-check whether or not you have done a good job choosing a science project topic, think about the following questions and answer "yes" or "no" honestly.
Is my topic interesting enough to read about, then work on for the next couple months?
Can I find at least 3 trust-worthy reference materials on this subject?
Can I measure changes to the important factors (variables) using a number that represents a quantity such as a count, percentage, length, width, weight, voltage, velocity, energy, time, etc.?

Or, just as good, will I measure a factor (variable) that is simply present or not present? For example,

  • lights on in one trial, then lights off in another trial,
  • use fertilizer in one trial, then do not use fertilizer in another trial.
Can I change only one factor (variable) at a time, and control other factors that might influence your experiment, so that they do not interfere?
Is my experiment safe to perform?
Can I get all the materials and equipment I need for my experiment?
Do I have enough time to do my experiment more than once before the science fair?
Does my science fair project meet all the rules and requirements for the science fair?
Have I checked to see if my science fair project will require Scientific Review Committee approval?

If you answered "no" to any of the self-check questions then your topic may not be a good one. Consider changing your topic or asking your teacher or another adult mentor for help.