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Explore Nutrition Science Projects (10 results)

Through kitchen chemistry, discover for yourself nutritional content in your food. Design a method to extract and measure substances in a food or drink. Or do a hands-on experiment to test how a nutrient works.

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Science Fair Project Idea
How much iron is in your cereal? In this experiment, you will devise a way of testing foods for supplemental iron additives. Then you will use your design to test different breakfast cereals to see how much iron they contain. Which brand of cereal will have the most iron in it? Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
What do pizza, milk shakes, and ice cream sundaes have in common, besides being delicious and loaded with calories? You might be surprised to learn that these foods, because they contain dairy products, cannot be eaten by the majority of people around the world. Dairy products contain the sugar molecule lactose, and the majority of people on the planet slowly begin to lose the ability to digest lactose after the age of 2. In this human biology and health science fair project, you will… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Did you know that your body needs a certain amount of iron in order to stay healthy? Iron can be found in much of what you consume each day. Almond flour—frequently used in cookies—is just one example of an iron-rich food. However, only a small fraction of the iron in food gets absorbed by the body, partially because the body can only absorb dissolved iron. In this project, you will study whether the acidic environment in your stomach helps dissolve iron. You will use a color-based… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever noticed that the salt you are using says it is "iodized"? Iodine is an important micronutrient, which means we need it in small quantities to be healthy. Because iodine is rare in many people's normal diets, it is added to table salt. Then when people salt their food, they are also adding this important micronutrient. In this food science project, you will use some kitchen-friendly chemistry to investigate which types of salt have iodine added (in the form of iodide) and which do… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Thinking about improving your sports performance? Want to help friends and family make the most of their physical fitness activities? One factor to consider is food! Whether you realize it or not, what you eat does change your body! It affects how you feel, and can even change how you perform in sports. This science fair project will help you explore the link between what goes in your mouth and what your legs and arms can do. Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever wondered how nutritionists know how many Calories a certain food contains? In this project you will learn a method for measuring how many Calories (how much chemical energy) is available in different types of food. You will build your own calorimeter to capture the energy released by burning a small food item, like a nut or a piece of popcorn. This project gives a new meaning to the phrase "burning calories!" Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
The makers of sports drinks spend tens to hundreds of millions of dollars advertising their products each year. Among the benefits often featured in these ads are the beverages' high level of electrolytes, which your body loses as you sweat. In this science project, you will compare the amount of electrolytes in a sports drink with those in orange juice to find out which has more electrolytes to replenish the ones you lose as you work out or play sports. When you are finished, you might even… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
As you know, vegetables not only taste good, but they are good for you. Many vegetables are a great source of vitamin C. Vitamin C is a water-soluble antioxidant that plays an important role in protecting the body from infection and disease. Humans do not make vitamin C on their own, so we must get it from dietary sources. Potatoes, like the ones shown in Figure 1, below, are one good source of vitamin C. Does cooking them affect how much vitamin C they have? In other words, if you boil a… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin that has many functions in the body. Vitamin C is needed to bolster the immune system. It is an antioxidant that protects LDL cholesterol from oxidative damage, and it is needed to make collagen, a substance that strengthens many parts of the body, such as muscles and blood vessels. Our bodies do not make vitamin C, so we must get it from dietary sources. Citrus fruits, carrots, avocados, and spinach all have vitamin C. Bell peppers, like the ones shown in… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Maple syrup on pancakes, ripe bananas, and soft drinks are all foods that are tasty to us because of the sugar in them. But did you know there are different kinds of sugar? One food can have multiple kinds of sugar in it, and our bodies actually process the different types of sugars differently. In this science project, you will measure the concentration of two sugars—glucose and sucrose—in different foods, and investigate how sucrose is converted into glucose with the help… Read more
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