Salt Oscillator *

Areas of Science Chemistry
Difficulty
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
*Note: For this science project you will need to develop your own experimental procedure. Use the information in the summary tab as a starting place. If you would like to discuss your ideas or need help troubleshooting, use the Ask An Expert forum. Our Experts won't do the work for you, but they will make suggestions and offer guidance if you come to them with specific questions.

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Abstract

Fill a jar a little more than half full with fresh water. Make a solution of salt water, and add a drop or two of food coloring to it. Pour the salt water solution into a plastic cup with a small hole in the bottom, and then place the cup in the jar with fresh water. (The only connection between the fresh and salt water should be via the hole in the bottom of the cup.) With the right combination of hole size and salt concentration, you will see an oscillating current develop in the jar. Experiment to find which hole sizes and salt concentrations work best. (Johnson, 2005)

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MLA Style

Science Buddies Staff. "Salt Oscillator." Science Buddies, 28 July 2017, https://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project-ideas/Chem_p052/chemistry/salt-oscillator. Accessed 14 Dec. 2019.

APA Style

Science Buddies Staff. (2017, July 28). Salt Oscillator. Retrieved from https://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project-ideas/Chem_p052/chemistry/salt-oscillator


Last edit date: 2017-07-28

Bibliography

Johnson, M.R., 2005. "Flow Dynamics of the Salt Oscillator," California State Science Fair Project Abstract [accessed February 27, 2006] http://www.usc.edu/CSSF/History/2005/Projects/J0112.pdf.

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Experimental Procedure

For this science project you will need to develop your own experimental procedure. Use the information in the summary tab as a starting place. If you would like to discuss your ideas or need help troubleshooting, use the Ask An Expert forum. Our Experts won't do the work for you, but they will make suggestions and offer guidance if you come to them with specific questions.

If you want a Project Idea with full instructions, please pick one without an asterisk (*) at the end of the title.

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Ask an Expert

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