Active Time
< 10 minutes
Total Project Time
< 10 minutes
Key Concepts
Carbonation, buoyancy, density

Introduction

Have you ever opened a fresh bottle of carbonated water or soda, poured a glass of it, and just watched as the bubbles fizzed upward in the glass? Have you ever wondered what those bubbles are? They're made of carbon dioxide gas, which was packed tight in the soda before you opened the bottle. Not only can that carbon dioxide gas give you a fizzy drink to enjoy, but it can also give you a show. How? By making candy conversation hearts "dance!" Along the way you will discover some of the fun chemistry for this entertaining activity. So this Valentine's Day if you receive some conversation hearts, you can grab a glass of soda and try out this science activity to explore another way to enjoy the candies—by watching them slowly dance!

Credits

Teisha Rowland, PhD, Science Buddies
Ben Finio, PhD, Science Buddies
This activity is not appropriate for use as a science fair project. Good science fair projects have a stronger focus on controlling variables, taking accurate measurements, and analyzing data. To find a science fair project that is just right for you, browse our library of over 1,200 Science Fair Project Ideas or use the Topic Selection Wizard to get a personalized project recommendation.

Materials

  • Clear drinking glass
  • Clear carbonated beverage
  • Candy conversation hearts
    Materials required for dancing candy heart science project

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Active Time
< 10 minutes
Total Project Time
< 10 minutes
Key Concepts
Carbonation, buoyancy, density
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