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Photography, Digital Photography & Video Project Ideas (24 results)

Photography utilizes many different technologies to produce the pictures and videos we've come to take for granted: optics, electronics, mathematics, computer science, materials science, and mechanical engineering, to name a few. That makes photography a great source of possible science fair project ideas. Browse our list of photography and video projects to see what captures your attention.

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Science Fair Project Idea
You can compare the picture quality for photos taken at different shutter speeds with the camera handheld vs. with the camera on a tripod. (This is best done with a camera that has manual exposure control.) Read more
Photo_p017
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Science Fair Project Idea
Compare the strengths and weaknesses of different digital image formats. How does the amount of compression affect a JPEG image? What happens when you save a JPEG image multiple times? Read more
Photo_p019
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Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Science Fair Project Idea
How does the angle between the lens, the subject's eye, and the flash effect the appearance of red eye? How does the subject's eye color effect red eye? Read more
Photo_p022
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Science Fair Project Idea
Digital cameras can be a great way to learn about photography. Most digital cameras today have LCD screens, so you get instant feedback on your photo. If you make a mistake, no problem, you just delete the picture. It's nice that you don't have to worry about the expense and bother of developing film! This project can help you learn to take better pictures. Read more
Photo_p014
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites You'll need a digital camera that take pictures in manual mode (a grayscale, or 'black-and-white' mode, is nice to have but not essential). You will need to know how to change the shutter speed, lens aperture, and ISO setting. A tripod for the camera is nice to have, but not absolutely essential. You will also need a computer.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
Here's an interesting flash photography project. With an inexpensive Fresnel lens, you can concentrate the light from your flash. You'll be able to shoot with a smaller aperture and a shorter flash duration. This will give you greater depth of focus and will allow you to 'freeze' motion at higher speeds. The trade-off is that the light will be concentrated toward the center of the frame. This project shows you how you can investigate that trade-off and find out how you can best use your flash… Read more
Photo_p013
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites You'll need a camera with a separate flash attachment to do this project.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety Be careful in sunlight: the Fresnel lens used in this project can focus enough sunlight to cause burns, melt your flash attachment, or set fires.
Science Fair Project Idea
A strobe light can illuminate an entire room in just tens of microseconds. Inexpensive strobe lights can flash up to 10 or 20 times per second. This project shows you how to use stroboscopic photography to analyze motion. Read more
Photo_p003
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites This project requires camera with adjustable shutter speeds and lens apertures, a tripod and cable release.
Material Availability Specialty items
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety No hazards
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to have an extra sense? What if you could hear above the normal range (ultrasound) like dogs or bats? What if you could see ultraviolet light, like bees or juvenile trout? What if you could see infrared light, like a rattlesnake or boa constrictor? This project shows you how you can use a camera, tripod and a special filter to take pictures using near infrared illumination. It's a whole new way of looking at the world. Read more
Photo_p004
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites You'll need a camera with near infrared sensitivity (see Experimental Procedure)
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Average ($50 - $100)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
If you sit under a leafy tree on a sunny day, you may notice spots of sunlight on the ground from light passing through spaces between the leaves. Try putting a piece of cardboard on the ground and examining the spots of light on the cardboard. Even though the spaces through which the light is passing are irregular in shape, the spots on the cardboard are round. What you are seeing, in fact, are projected images of the sun. Light passing through an aperture forms an image. A pinhole camera… Read more
Photo_p005
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites Must have digital camera capable of taking long, controlled exposures without flash.
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
A video camera records 30 "frames" or distinct images per second. (That's for an NTSC camera in the U.S. PAL cameras in other areas of the world take 25 frames per second.) You can use this fact to time events and measure speed. One student has used a video camera to measure the speed of an arrow shot from a bow. The following project can help you set up your experiment: Distance and Speed of Rolling Objects Measured from Video Recordings . Read more
Photo_p016
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Science Fair Project Idea
Imagine you are on a trip and see something interesting that you want to share with your friends. What do you do? You take a picture with your cell phone and e-mail it to them, of course. But did you realize that the same technology can be used to save lives? Using their cell phones modified as inexpensive microscopes, medical personnel can look at blood smears to help diagnose diseases like malaria and cholera. In this photography science project you will build a simple and inexpensive cell… Read more
Photo_p024
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Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability You will need access to a cell phone that enables you at least to zoom manually in and out. You will need a 1-millimeter (mm) optical ball lens to magnify the sample. See the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety To prevent eye damage, never look directly into the light source.
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