Science Fair Project Idea
Night-lights can be found in many homes; you might even have one in your bedroom! Using a night-light is a great way to avoid stubbing your toe on furniture during a midnight trip to the bathroom. In this fun engineering project, you will design and build your own night-light. You will need to build the circuit, but you will also need to think about the physical design of the product. Most people probably do not want an ugly, bare circuit board sitting around their house. Can you make a… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Does green apple juice taste the same as red apple juice? That might seem like a silly question. Food coloring does not have any flavor—so how could it change how something tastes? Find out whether it does in this food science project! Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Can you catch a bubble with your hands? What if you use another material, like a piece of paper or aluminum foil? Try this science project to find out which materials can catch a bubble without popping it. Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever seen a video of a glitter prank package? They usually show an unsuspecting person opening a package or a gift, only to be sprayed by a shower of glitter. Former NASA engineer Mark Rober got tired of thieves stealing packages off his porch, so he decided to build an elaborate decoy glitter package*, as he shows in this video. Mark's device involves a lot of custom software, electronics, and 3D printing, so might seem a little intimidating if you are new to engineering. This video… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Can you build a volleyball machine? It will need one part to launch a ping pong ball over a net and another to return the ball. How many back-and-forth volleys can you get before the ball touches the ground? While the 2019 Fluor Engineering Challenge is over, you can still try this fun project out yourself. Follow the rules and compare your score to top scores from around the world! Looking for this year's challenge? Check out our main Fluor Engineering Challenge page for all the latest… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Why do the planets orbit the sun without flying off into space? Do they move in perfect circles or do their orbits take a different shape? And how could you possibly do a science project about any of this—you can't do an experiment with the planets! However, you can build a model of our solar system that demonstrates the concept of gravity, using balls of different sizes to represent the sun and planets. Watch this video for an excellent introduction to the model: … Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Do you want to build a solar-powered car? How about enter it in a competition and race it against other people's designs? If so, this is the project for you! These instructions will show you how to get started building a solar-powered car that you can enter in a science or engineering fair. No experience needed. If you want, you can even compete in the Junior Solar Sprint, a regional competition for solar-powered cars. Get more information about your regional competition. Are you a teacher?… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Have you ever seen a tall sailboat and wondered how they don't flip over when it's windy? Try this project and learn about the physics behind how sailboats stay upright. Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Look around you. What types of objects do you see in the room? Furniture, lights, a computer, a fan, pencils, books, etc.? Where did they come from? Odds are you did not build them yourself. You or your parents probably bought them at a store. Before that, they were built in a factory somewhere. And even before that, they were probably designed by engineers. You might think of engineers when you think of complex machines like rockets or huge structures like bridges, but engineers also design… Read more
Science Fair Project Idea
Eardrums are membranes inside your ears that vibrate when sound waves hit them. These vibrations are converted into electrical signals and sent to your brain, which allows you to hear sound. The frequency response of your eardrum, or the range of frequencies that will cause it to vibrate, determines your hearing range. Typical human hearing ranges from about 20 Hz up to 20,000 Hz, although the ability to hear high frequencies typically degrades as you get older. Some other animals can… Read more
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Free science fair projects.